Call for 2019 Deck Safety Ambassadors

Deadline: April 30th, 2019

May is Deck Safety Month®

Join NADRA in promoting Deck Safety Month by becoming an official Deck Safety Ambassador! Platinum, Gold, Silver, Bronze & Partner Levels are available from $350 to the $3,000 top tier sponsor! Click the “Become a Sponsor!” button to sign up & receive your 2019 Deck Safety Ambassador Logo. Benefit packages are also highlighted within this link. Customized Deck Safety Toolkits are also back again this year. Follow the link to learn more. Please email Info@NADRA.org with any questions. 

*You must be a current member of NADRA to participate. 

NADRA Deck Evaluation Course Offered at JLC Live – New England

MARCH 27TH, 2019 – 8AM – 12:30PM – RHODE ISLAND CONVENTION CENTER

Location: Rhode Island Convention Center – 1 Sabin St. Providence, RI 02903. Hotel and Travel details can be found here.

About the class: NADRA, working together with ASHI hope to educate, promote, and enhance deck inspections and deck safety through education and improved inspection process. Learn what has changed in deck construction, understand the cause of deck failures, and the implications systems like dry below. After attending the deck session you’ll never look at a deck the same way.

This event is open to all industry professionals including, but not limited to: Inspectors, builders, contractors, remodelers, architects, designers, students, manufacturers, distributors, sales representatives and more.

The NADRA Deck Evaluation / Inspection Course Includes …

The Existing Structure. The features on the exterior of a house, such as windows, overhead cables, and dryer vents require certain considerations when in proximity to a deck or other walking surface.  Numerous building, plumbing, mechanical, electrical, and fuel-gas systems must be considered when judging how effectively a deck works with a home.

The course is intended to assist the ASHI home inspector & industry professionals the opportunity to assess the deck construction and safety issues.  Better understand how to analyze the following deck components and issues and more:

  • Stairs
  • Footings and Posts
  • Joists, Joist Connections, and Girders
  • Ledger Connections
  • Deck Boards
  • Handrail Assemblies and Guards
  • Recognize proper and improper fasteners
  • Assess hardware and material corrosion

The NADRA Deck Evaluation checklist has been developed specifically for industry professionals as a comprehensive tool to be used to properly assess the safety issues of a deck.

Registration Pricing & Instructions:

  • NADRA Member Pricing: Class & Certification: $125.00 (includes 4 ASHI CE’S)
  • Education Only: $75.00
  • Not a Member of NADRA yet? Join online now & come back to registration.
  • Click the “Register Now” button below. Use Promo Code “NADRA” for a free exhibit hall pass. The pass is included with your class registration.Once you set up your account you will see the NADRA class listed at the bottom of the page. Select your option and proceed with registration. 

Download the Event Flyer:

About Jim Mailey, Instructor:

Jim is the Midwest, Northeast and Mid-Atlantic training specialist for Simpson Strong-Tie.

Jim is considered an expert in safe, outdoor wood deck construction and is an advisor on structural issues for the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA). Joining Simpson Strong-Tie in 1992, Jim has given over 500 workshops and seminars to more than 35,000 design professionals, building officials, home inspectors, builders, contractors and dealers.

He has developed numerous programs designed to educate industry professionals about how to install Simpson Strong-Tie® products as well as how structural products meet various building code requirements and safety standards.

He has been doing education to home inspectors since 1998 and was the 1st person to provide a complete program on what to look for on a deck to home inspectors at InspectionWorld in New Orleans in 2008. Additionally, he was the 1st person to provide deck education to contractors for NADRA.

He has written articles about deck safety for the ASHI Reporter and NAHI Forum home inspector publications and has written for ThisIsCarpentry about deck construction. He has been quoted in numerous contractor magazines and internet articles about deck safety.

In 2018, Jim Mailey was the recipient of the Terry Award in honor of his extraordinary dedication & unwavering commitment to creating and driving deck safety awareness across North America and beyond.

Jim earned a B.A. in Biology from Bloomsburg University in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

NADRA attends American Society of Civil Engineer’s (ASCE) Live and Dead Load Subcommittee meeting

By Glenn Mathewson

Another public comment was also presented, one that could have a major impact on decking.

How to build guards has never been provided for in the code, and even the loads that guards must resist have been pretty fuzzy throughout code history.  Those target loads have come into some pretty serious question now that so much testing is being conducted to assure guard posts will meet a 500 lb or greater load.  The current code requires the top of a guard and handrail to resist a 200 lb. load in any direction. Any direction means upward and inward, two directions that have nothing to do with a guard’s purpose, fall protection from an elevated surface.  They do relate to a handrail’s purpose, to brace a fall in any direction and to assist in ascending or descending stairs or ramps.

The ASTM testing standards for composite rails and the ICC Evaluation Services acceptance criteria for other manufactured guards don’t exactly match the code, and the loads are questioned in all.  This problem is well understood, yet meanwhile, proponents have been only narrowly defeated in the last two code modification cycles in their attempts to have prescriptive ands specific guard post connection details included in the IRC.  It is the opinion of many others that the target loading and the direction of loading needs to be reevaluated and set more appropriately, before methods to meet the loads are solidified in code. That was the reason I, taking NADRA’s voice, attended the American Society of Civil Engineer’s (ASCE) Live and Dead Load Subcommittee meeting on November 7th, 2018.

The ASCE 7 standard is the nation’s go-to for establishing the minimum design loads for structures of all sorts.  It’s generally the basis for the loads in the I-codes. So rather than attempt this change for guard loading at the ICC level, we went one level further in.  The ASCE meeting was to review proposals and ideas for the next 2022 version of the ASCE 7 and proposals they are planning for the 2021 IBC development next year.  The National Home Builders’ Association (NAHB), a friend to NADRA, led the charge with public comment proposals to the ASCE committee requesting guards and handrails be separated and their minimum loads and load directions be individually determined.  While a handrail does need to resist a load in any direction, a guard does not. I spoke at the meeting in favor of the NAHB public comment and provided history of guard and handrails loads going back to the 1970. Over those years, guard and handrail minimum design loads were quite varied.  On the west coast, under the Uniform Building Code, only a 20 lb. horizontal load applied 90 degrees to the guard, but on the east coast, under the Standard Building Code, it was 200 lb. in any direction. From the 70’s to 2000 IRC, guards underwent a lot of changes regarding design load, but still at that time guards weren’t tested by any more than a push from the inspector.  Guards and handrail loads were combined, then separated, but then in later years combined again.

The history and the companion testimony at the meeting helped show the ASCE committee that indeed today’s design loads in the code and the ASCE standard are due for reevaluation.  Before building the house of new deck codes, let’s make sure we have a good foundation. Alongside NADRA and the NAHB, the Stair Manufacturers’ Association and the Composite Lumber Manufacturers’ Association also provided insight into this much-needed reevaluation.  The ASCE Committee agreed and affirmed a motion to work with the NAHB further on this issue. This was a great step in the right direction.

Though we attended the meeting for the guard discussion, there was more to learn.  Code and standard proposals and recommendations can come from anyone. Being present and available to learn of those other proposals and to quickly respond is a very important part of representing an industry in code.

Another public comment was also presented, one that could have a major impact on decking.  Stair treads are required to resist the familiar 40 psf live load that a deck surface must resist, but they also must resist a concentrated load of 300 lb. over a 4-square-inch area.  This has to do with the impact from the balls of your feet while rapidly descending stairs. It has been in the codes for all stair treads since 1979. You may be familiar with composite decking stair tread span limitations.  Due to this additional concentrated load, most composite decking has reduced allowable spans when used as stair treads. 16-inch on center joists for the deck, often have to be reduced to 12 inch or less on the stairs. A surprise proposal we were not expecting was to require the same stair tread concentrated load throughout the deck.  Changing the minimum loading requirements, means re-proving that decking can meet the new loads, including the lumber decking spans brought into the code in 2015. If these changes were made, they would need to be with good justification and industry-wide evaluation.

The proponent argument for this proposal was in response to impact from stepping off ladders and known cases of deck board failure.   What wasn’t shared is how many instances? How old was the decking? What was the condition? These were all questions posed by others in the room, as it is becoming well known that well-intended reactions to anecdotal instances have shaped a lot of recent codes.  The very quick question I, we, NADRA, asked was why decks are being singled out and not all floor systems? If this is a human impact load on a floor surface, then what distinguishes the hazard between the floor inside the house and the deck? Why would the decking industry be singled out?  Do we not use ladders inside the home? There was no solid answer to these questions and an affirmative motion to shelf the proposal and request more information and reason statements from the proponent.

Our efforts at this meeting have helped already to steer the future, but the winds are strong and the journey long. We need your support to stay involved in this critical work.

California balcony/deck/ porch inspection law

“Now 15 percent of the load-bearing, exterior elements on apartment buildings and complexes with three or more units must be inspected every six years. Elements that must be inspected include balconies, decks, porches, stairs, walkways and entryways.”

By: Keith Burbank

POSTED: SEP 17 2018 10:19PM PDT

Gov. Brown signs balcony inspection law following deadly Berkeley collapse

By Bay City News Service, read the original story here.

Gov. Jerry Brown today signed a bill requiring inspections of apartment balconies, decks, outdoor stairs and elevated walkways to hopefully avoid deaths from collapses like the one in Berkeley in 2015.

At a birthday party in June 2015, six young people died when a fifth-story balcony collapsed, according to the office of state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, who co-authored the bill, Senate Bill 721.

An investigation revealed the balcony had been poorly sealed and became infested with dry rot and the builder had a history of lawsuits related to construction defects, Hill’s office said.

Now 15 percent of the load-bearing, exterior elements on apartment buildings and complexes with three or more units must be inspected every six years. 

Elements that must be inspected include balconies, decks, porches, stairs, walkways and entryways.

Those elements must be inspected if they extend beyond the building’s exterior walls and are six or more feet above the ground and get stability and support from wood or wood-based products. 

State Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, was the other author of the bill. 

Read the bill here

NADRA Upcoming Education Schedule

Great Plains ASHI, 24th Annual Fall Seminar:

Kansas City, MO – ASHI Chapter Annual Fall Seminar. 

WHEN: September 21, 2018 7:00 AM to September 22, 2018 4:00 PM

Jim Mailey- North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) Deck Evaluation Class. This is the same class taught in preparation for taking the NADRA Certification Exam. The test can be done at the Great Plains Fall Seminar or taken online with 30 days after the class. There is an additional fee for a one year membership and certification test. Deck inspection education is valuable even if you choose not to take the test and become certified.

Learn more & REGISTER

Remodeling / DeckExpo: 

Baltimore, MD –NADRA offers specific industry courses at the show, which gives you the option to receive your certifications. You can add these sessions onto your registration during the online registration process.

WHEN: Tuesday October 9th, 2018

Deck Evaluation / Inspection Program: Tuesday, October 9th, 2018 at 8am. Instructor: Jim Mailey.This program will allow Inspectors the opportunity to evaluate a deck using the NADRA Deck Evaluation checklist.  The NADRA Deck Evaluation checklist has been developed specifically for industry professionals as a comprehensive tool to assess the safety issues of a deck properly.

Down The Load Path: Tuesday, October 9th, 2018 at 1pm. Instructor: Glenn Mathewson. This program will allow industry professionals the opportunity to learn about the new 2018 IRC provisions; this course completes the load path started in course 2, Ledgers and Lateral Loads. Decking, joists, beams, posts, foundations, and properties of the earth covered so that the entire structural system and related codes can be understood.

Learn more & REGISTER

INSPECTIONWORLD: 

San Diego, CA – Town & Country Resort

WHEN: Sunday, January 20th 8am – 12pm (4 ASHI CEs)

NADRA Deck Inspection Certification Class:  This program will allow the home inspector the opportunity to employ the ability to safely inspect a deck using the NADRA Deck Evaluation checklist. The NADRA Deck Evaluation checklist has been developed specifically for home inspectors as a comprehensive tool to be used to properly assess the safety issues of a deck. After the program the home inspector will understand how to analyze the following deck components and issues and more: 

  • Stair
  • Footings and Posts
  • Joists
  • Joist Connections
  • Girders
  • Ledger Connections
  • Deck Boards
  • Handrail Assemblies and Guards
  • Recognize proper and improper fasteners
  • Assess hardware or material corrosion
  • Review of the safety standards of all (decks, stairs, guards) structures.

Learn more & REGISTER

Couple injured when deck collapses at Des Moines home

It’s Important to Check Your Deck®

Authorities say a man and woman were injured when their elevated deck collapsed at their home in northeast Des Moines while they were grilling food.

The Des Moines Register reports the incident occurred just after 5 p.m. Monday. Des Moines Police Sgt. Tina Kalar says rotted wood may have allowed the deck to fall away from the house.

The 72-year-old woman was taken to a hospital for treatment of burns from the grill’s contents. Her 69-year-old husband was treated at an urgent care center.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Read the original article here

NADRA reminds homeowners to Check Your Deck®

“Your roof has a life expectancy. Your windows have a life expectancy. What about your deck?” Says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of NADRA.  Just like other products exposed to the environment, over time your deck will need to be replaced. Asphalt shingles have a life expectancy of about 20 years*.  Aluminum and vinyl windows are expected to last 15-20 years*. Beaudry continues… “With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired.”  It’s important for homeowners to check their deck on a yearly basis.

NADRA is working diligently with ASHI, The American Society of Home Inspectors, as well as, AIBD, The American Institute of Building Design. The associations are working towards educating and certifying thousands of industry professionals to meet the need for inspecting the millions of decks that are past their useful life. Homeowners can search for qualified inspectors at www.NADRA.org.

About NADRA:

The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of  deck buildersinspectorsmanufacturers, dealers/distributors, lumberyards, wholesalers, retailers, and service providers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. Visit www.NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources.

*Source: National Association of HomeBuilders/Bank of America Home Equity, Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components 2/07.

© Copyright 2018 North American Deck and Railing Association. All rights reserved.

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Deck Safety Marketing Resources are Available to Help Outdoor Living Industry Professionals

May is Deck Safety Month®, the North American Decking and Railing Association reminds professionals to take advantage of exclusive deck safety marketing resources along with press release templates, graphics, ads, social media content, flyers, and more.

The North American Decking and Railing Association (NADRA) offers industry professionals and inspectors a breadth of resources, including a comprehensive toolkit, marketing materials, and inspection checklists.

  • 10-point consumer checklist
  • Deck Evaluation Form: A step-by-step guide to evaluating the integrity of the deck structure, stairs, surface, and railings. A downloadable form and online form (BETA) are available to members and non-members.
  • Certified inspector program: NADRA is working diligently with ASHI, The American Society of Home Inspectors, as well as, AIBD, The American Institute of Building Design. The associations are working towards educating and certifying thousands of industry professionals to meet the need for inspecting the millions of decks that are past their useful life. Classes are available for scheduling.
  • Deck Safety Ambassadors: Help spread the word about deck safety by becoming a Deck Safety Ambassador. Sponsors gain access to an exclusive Ambassador logo and marketing benefits to further promote their businesses.
  • Homeowner resources: Builders can download the 10-Point Deck Safety Consumer Checklist to pass along to customers. Though not a replacement for a professional deck inspection, the checklist can assist homeowners and provide reference during other times of the year.

Communicating safe decking standards remains a top priority for NADRA. We continue to focus our efforts on educating both pros and consumers on proper deck installation practices as well as on consistent deck inspections. At the same time, we know that deck safety offers professionals in the industry a great opportunity to market their business, so we’ve provided all of the tools to help you do just that. If you have any questions, please reach out. You can contact the team at NADRA by calling: 215-679-4884 or sending an email to: Info@NADRA.org

Just a small sampling of the many marketing resources available in the members section of NADRA.org: 

Flyer: 

Facebook Visual Graphic: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AZEK Building Products Joins with NADRA to Encourage Homeowners to Check Your Deck® During Deck Safety Month® in May

SKOKIE, Ill.May 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Now that spring is here, everyone will want to enjoy their decks as much as possible.  However, older decks or those with structural issues could be at risk for collapse, causing serious injury to you and your loved ones.  The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is partnering with AZEK Building Products during Deck Safety Month® in May to promote deck safety.  AZEK, a world leader in decking with the AZEK® and TimberTech® brands, recommends homeowners Check Your Deck® before those fun outdoor barbecues.

Contractors can use a different color edge board to show a change in elevation as an extra safety measure. Shown: TimberTech Antiqua Gold with Antigua Palm accent.

“Our first priority is homeowner safety,” says Bruce Stanhope, Vice President, Research and Development, AZEK Building Products.  “Because decks are exposed to extreme weather and temperatures over the years, they need to be inspected by a professional home inspector for structural integrity to ensure they are safe and strong.”

NADRA’s Michael Beaudry, executive vice president, agrees. “With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired,” he says. “Consider the snowfall from the past year– the heavy loads cause additional stress on outdoor structures and create a need to re-evaluate.”

Special attention should be placed on older decks built before codes and safety were enforced. “AZEK is dedicated to consumer safety at all levels, so we have an entire department devoted to code compliance,” Stanhope noted. “Homeowners should make sure their decking meets residential code listings and that railings are strong and certified for load bearing.”

“AZEK and TimberTech brands are protected with capped technology for resistance to weather, and for high-performance and low-maintenance,” says Stanhope. “However, you never know what is happening within the substructure, so the Check Your Deck® reminder helps to ensure a safe deck season.”

Check out NADRA’s “10-Point Consumer Safety Checklist” for tips on making decks safer at www.NADRA.org.  Or, to learn more about AZEK Building Products, visit www.azek.com.

About AZEK® Building Products:
AZEK Building Products, a division of The AZEK® Company, is a leader in the development of premium, low-maintenance exterior building products. Available to a worldwide audience, our product lines span AZEK® Deck, Rail, Trim, Moulding, Porch, Pavers, and Adhesives, as well as capped wood composite decking and railing under the TimberTech® name. Both brands, synonymous with quality and innovation and made in America, lead their market areas by continually reinventing product lines and redefining entire product categories. For more information about AZEK, visit www.azek.com. For more information on TimberTech, visit www.timbertech.com.

About NADRA:
The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of deck buildersinspectorsmanufacturers, dealers/distributors, lumberyards, wholesalers, retailers, and service providers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. Visit www.NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources.

SOURCE AZEK Building Products

National Nail’s CAMO® Supports NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® in May

Grand Rapids, MI, May 02, 2018 – Spring has sprung and it’s time to think about deck building and life outdoors.  To help keep homeowners safe, CAMO is joining the efforts of the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) during Deck Safety Month® in May to promote deck safety.  National Nail’s CAMO deck fastening systems include revolutionary CAMO Edge Fastening that drives the fastener into the side of the boards and the joist, as well as face fasteners and clips for a variety of ways to fasten the substructure and deck boards.

National Nail’s CAMO supports NADRA’s Deck Safety Month(R) to provide tips to keep decks safe. With the strongest fasteners on the market, National Nail features face fasteners, clips and the revolutionary CAMO Edge Fastening (shown here) that drives the fastener into the side of the boards and the joist for added stability.

“Proper, strong fastening and connections are critical to deck safety,” said Greg Palmer, Marketing Director, National Nail.  “The feedback we’ve had from contractors indicate that National Nail has the strongest fasteners on the market and our CAMO Edge Fastening system has been touted as adding stability to a deck time and again because it fastens the board on both sides and attaches the deck board directly to the joist.”

There are some common culprits that can cause decks to become unsafe or even collapse. The experts at CAMO suggest having a professional home inspector check the following to keep your deck in top shape:

  • Check the ledger board connection that attaches the deck to the house and for board splitting.
  • Fastener corrosion
  • Lateral movement, uplift and racking
  • Warped, rotted or loose boards
  • Raised fasteners that present a tripping hazard
  • Hanger/toe nail failure
  • Loose or comprised railings
  • Post and beam failure
  • Ensure the deck is up to current local codes

Palmer also cited older decks as being particularly at risk, because they may have been built before codes were established.  “There are cases where the deck is attached to the house with nails and that is extremely dangerous,” he said.

NADRA’s Michael Beaudry, executive vice president says it’s important to Check Your Deck® for these issues every season to keep you and your loved ones safe. “With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired,” he says. Heavy snow, rain, the elements and wear and tear can take their toll on the structure.”

Check out NADRA’s “10-Point Consumer Safety Checklist” for tips on making decks safer at www.NADRA.org.  Or, learn more about National Nail’s CAMO deck fasteners at www.camofasteners.com. Be sure to “Like”  CAMO at @camofasteners on Facebook and @camodeckfasteners on Instagram.

NADRA Announces Deck Safety Campaign

This year, Hanley Wood is a Bronze Level sponsor of the trade association’s efforts to make new and existing decks safer.

In the spring, with warm weather slowly spreading northward, more and more people refocus on outdoor living and resume using their decks. That’s one of the reasons why NADRA has designated May as its official Deck Safety Month. The campaign goal is to educate consumers, industry professionals, and inspectors about proper deck installation, and to promote the importance of annual inspections. To help in those efforts, NADRA has set up a deck safety page on its website, where you can find an easy-to-follow 10-point safety checklist for homeowners, a longer deck evaluation form (including an online version) and training for pros and home inspectors, and links to its deck safety ambassador program, introduced last year. By the way, Hanley Wood (the parent company of PDB) recently announced that it is a Bronze Level sponsor of the program. You can learn more about the program and sponsorship opportunities here.

Read the original article here.