Deckorators® Booth to Host “The Ultimate Deck Podcast” at DeckExpo 2019

Popular podcast for deck builders coming to booth 1019 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., October 1, 2019 – Deckorators® a leading manufacturer of composite decking, deck railing, balusters, post caps and related products, will host The Ultimate Deck Podcast in booth 1019 at DeckExpo 2019, Nov. 7-8 at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

Hosted by Shane Chapman, Wade Laurent and Justin MacRae of The Ultimate Deck Shop in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, The Ultimate Deck Podcast discusses the deck-building industry, its people and the insights North American deck contractors need to be successful. The popular podcast will be recorded live in DeckExpo booth 1019 on Thursday, Nov. 7, from 1 to 4 p.m. and Friday, Nov. 8, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Chapman, Laurent and MacRae will capture their conversations with fellow deck builders, manufacturer representatives and other show attendees for their listeners on Podbean, Apple Podcasts and other podcast streaming services.

Guests expected to appear on the podcast to discuss new products, tips and trends include:

  • Sean Collinsgru, owner of Premier Outdoor Living LLC, Palmyra, New Jersey.
  • Leif Wirtanen, integrator and operations manager at Cascade Fence & Deck, Vancouver, Washington.
  • Joe Hagen, founder and president of All Decked Out, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • Additional Deckorators Certified Pros, industry personalities and representatives from manufacturers such as CAMO.

“The Ultimate Deck Podcast hosts give contractors and dealers an honest, inside look at the decking industry,” said Chris Camfferman, managing director, marketing for Deckorators. “As members of the building industry themselves, they offer listeners valuable opinions and ideas. We’re excited to partner with The Ultimate Deck Shop to bring the conversations of DeckExpo to those in the industry who are not in attendance.”

In addition to hosting the podcast, Deckorators will launch several exciting new products at the annual show, which is co-located with the Remodeling Show. Deckorators will also host an Instagram MeetUp (InstaMeet) at 2 p.m. on Thursday in booth 1019 for the growing community of deck builders on the social media network.

For more information on Deckorators, visit www.Deckorators.com/DeckExpo or visit booth 1019 in Louisville. For more about The Ultimate Deck Shop, visit www.ultimatedeckshop.com; listen to The Ultimate Deck Podcast on Podbean, Apple Podcasts and other podcast streaming services; and watch The Ultimate Deck Show on YouTube.

About Deckorators

Deckorators, the first name in decking, railing and accessories and the originator of the round aluminum baluster, is a brand of Universal Consumer Products, Inc., a subsidiary of Universal Forest Products, Inc. Deckorators started the low-maintenance aluminum balusters category with the Classic Series and has since led the industry with many new and innovative decking and railing products. Its approach to developing exciting and distinctive products allows both DIYers and builders to bring the personal creativity of interior design to outdoor living.

To learn more about Deckorators decking and railing accessories, visit www.deckorators.com or call 800-332-5724.

Follow Deckorators on Instagram: @Deckorators
Facebook: www.facebook.com/Deckorators
YouTube: www.youtube.com/DeckoratorsProducts
Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/deckorators 

UNIVERSAL FOREST PRODUCTS, INC. (NASDAQ: UFPI)

Universal Forest Products, Inc., soon to be known as UFP Industries, Inc., is a holding company that provides capital, management and administrative resources to subsidiaries that supply wood, wood composite and other products to three robust markets: retail, construction and industrial. Founded in 1955, the Company is headquartered in Grand Rapids, Mich., with affiliates throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. For more about Universal Forest Products, go to www.ufpi.com.

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AZEK BUILDING PRODUCTS PARTNERS WITH SNAVELY FOREST PRODUCTS

September 23, 2019 11:46 ET Source: AZEK Building Products

Chicago, Ill., Sept. 23, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — AZEK Building Products, a leading manufacturer of premium outdoor building materials, has announced a new partnership with Snavely Forest Products. The leading wholesale distributor of building products plans to offer the full lines of TimberTech® and AZEK®Exteriors products in key locations throughout Colorado and Wyoming.

“We are excited to partner with AZEK Building Products, a company that values quality products and prioritizes environmentally conscious manufacturing practices,” said Clark Spitzer, COO of Snavely Forest Products. “It’s well-known in the industry that they’re a first-class company with an outstanding reputation of excellence. Their long-standing commitment to sustainability and achieving the highest level of recycling in the decking industry perfectly aligns with our core values.”

The TimberTech and AZEK Exteriors portfolio of products provides customers with a range of high performance, low maintenance alternatives to wood. The products are made from a majority of recycled polymer to create an eco-friendly product with unrivaled style and versatility.

“It’s an honor to partner with Snavely Forest Products, a company with over 100 years of rich history of providing customers with the best building products in the industry,” said Joe Ochoa, president of AZEK Building Products. “By partnering with distributors who value sustainability and exceptional customer service, we all benefit from the opportunity of an even greater, collective commitment to service and innovation.”

AZEK Building Products manufactures all products in the United States. Snavely Forest Products partners with both domestic and international manufacturers to bring the very best building products to their customers. Together, they are set to partner at distribution centers across Colorado and Wyoming with potential to expand to other locations in the future. 

For more information on AZEK Building Products, visit TimberTech.com and AZEKexteriors.com.

For more information on Snavely Forest Products, visit snavelyforest.com.

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About AZEK Building Products

AZEK Building Products, a division of The AZEK Company, manufactures home building materials under two divisions: TimberTech® and AZEK® Exteriors. TimberTech offers a premium portfolio of capped polymer and capped composite decking – as well as railing, porch, lighting and paver products – while AZEK Exteriors manufactures distinctly unique trim and moulding. Together the brands present homeowners, builders, architects, dealers and contractors with a comprehensive suite of first-rate products that are long lasting, sustainable alternatives to wood. AZEK is headquartered in Chicago, IL (with plants in OH and PA) and also owns business operations of Minneapolis-based Ultralox railing systems. For more information visit AZEKCo.com or call 1-877-275-2935. 

About Snavely Forest Products

Founded in 1902, Snavely Forest Products (www.snavelyforest.com) is a recognized leader in the wholesale lumber industry. Delivering superior material, exceptional service and market expertise to both customers and vendors, clearly expresses a commitment to “Building Business for Our Partners”. Snavely Forest Products’ goal is to provide its customer’s access to the world’s best building products at competitive prices.

Tyler Rabel
Two by Four
312-445-4728
trabel@twoxfour.com

NADRA Code Update – Proposals RB185-19 and RB301-19 Guard Post Connections

August 29th, 2019

By: Glenn Mathewson

The latest 2018 edition of the International Residential Code provides a complete package of prescriptive structural design tables for decks… sort of…  When we think of structural design, most people imagine the skeleton of ledgers, joists, beams, and posts. At this completion, one might be ready for a “rough frame” inspection.  Install the decking and you’ve got a system that will hold people up, but it won’t keep them up. There’s a critical structural component of elevated decks that’s missing.

Guards.

Guards are barriers required at the edges of raised floors that help keep us from falling off.  They can be rails, cables or pipes. They can be wood, metal, vinyl, or glass. They can be benches, planter boxes, outdoor kitchens, or privacy walls.  Architecturally, they can be practically anything that meets the minimum height, maximum openings, and minimum structural capacity. Indeed, guards are part of the deck structure.  Table 301.5 requires a live load resistance of 200 lbs. in any direction along the top of the guard, but stops there. There is no guidance in the code for how to achieve this.

NADRA supported a proposal with others in the Deck Code Coalition to change that.  After many meetings with discussions ranging from a complete detail of guard construction to not adding anything, compromise (which is not a negative thing) and shared perspectives led us to common ground.  The proposal would prohibit a few notorious problems and provide some general language about the load path. This would be a good start. This is proposal RB185-19, and it was approved at the IRC Committee Action Hearing this March.  Here is a brief, bulleted summary of what it includes.

  • Guard posts must be connected into the deck framing, not just the outer joist or beam, where such member can rotate under load.
  • Guard posts cannot be fastened only into the end-grain of lumber.
  • Guard posts mounted on top of the deck (surface mounted) must be done according the manufacturer installation instruction and must connect to the deck framing or blocking.
  • Wood 4×4 guard posts cannot be notched at the point of connection.

While this will reduce the most egregious guard connections and make a big impact on safety, it still doesn’t provide any assurance of any guard construction capability.  That’s what proposal RB301-19 provides.

With such variety of guard design, it’s difficult to specify one method, and it risks all other designs being considered “noncompliant”.  Something common, however, to many guards is a wood post. This second guard proposal provides a handful of engineered methods to attach a guard post to wood deck framing that will meet the loads required by the IRC.  Methods using hardware and methods using only commodity fasteners are provided for design flexibility. These details are proposed for a new appendix chapter in the IRC, so they are not misunderstood as a strict requirement.  Appendix chapters are optional unless adopted as mandatory by a government. They provide guidance, and that is exactly the intent of the appendix we have proposed. This proposal was not approved at the first hearing, but we received good feedback as to why.  NADRA and the DCC members got back together and kept at it. We submitted a public comment in hopes of earning the ICC governmental membership approval this October at the Final Action Hearings.

Please support RB185-19 and RB301-19 and help us develop quality minimum standards for safe deck design and construction, while balancing affordability and freedom.

NADRA Code Update

July 3rd, 2019

By: Glenn Mathewson

To finish a marathon, you’ve got to push through the last mile.  Such is the same with developing a new edition of the International Residential Code.  Thousands of people are currently running a marathon toward the 2021 IRC, and though they are halfway through, there’s no telling who (or who’s proposals) will make it to the finish line.  While it’s too soon to start cheering, it’s not to soon to feel confident and strong, and that’s how the NADRA and Deck Code Coalition proposals are looking.

With the publishing of the final report from the Committee Action Hearings, the public can not only see the results of the hearing, but also a summary of the comments made by the committee.  There are three result categories, but since those aren’t “final” results, the comments should be the focus.  The committee comments could be looked at as spectators cheering on or booing the runners.  They provide direction, encouragement, and suggestions, much like “you got this! Keep going! You’re so close”.  Unfortunately, sometimes the comments can feel more like “you’re never going to make it! Give up now!  You look so tired!”

The race is not over until you pass the finish line, and sometimes people get a second wind.  That’s what the next phase of the code modification process can offer—a second chance.  Regardless of the committee result, every proposal can receive a public comment modification, and if received, the proposal will be heard again at the final hearings, where a final vote will be made…but not really.  The final vote is actually made online a few weeks after the hearing.  In this vote, only governmental ICC members can cast the final thumbs up or thumbs down.   These members could vote down a proposal approved by the committee, and likewise, the members could turn around a proposal disapproved by the committee.

Public comments to the committee results are due July 24th and these will be the catalyst for the next step in the process.  A proposal that does not receive a public comment is almost certain to be finalized as-is in the “bulk vote” where the governmental members vote for the entire package of proposals.  Having not received any disagreement from the public, the assumption is that the committee opinion is good to go.  Here is the part to pay close attention to:

If the committee result for a proposal is not challenged by July 24th, consider it done.  If there is something you don’t like, silence is equivalent to support.

So let me put it this way…  “Speak now or forever hold your peace”.

Okay…that’s not exactly true, but you would have to hold it until the 2024 IRC code development hearings where everything is on the table again.

Thanks to select NADRA members that have financially supported NADRA representation in the code modification process, I am working alongside other professionals in the Deck Code Coaltion and we are preparing public comments.  We are running this marathon until the end.  I hope you are on the sidelines cheering us on.  Here are the results and comments from the Committee Action Hearings that have us in a runner’s high.  You can view all the Group B ICC documents and the live video from the Group B hearing at this link:  https://www.iccsafe.org/products-and-services/i-codes/code-development/

RB184: Disapproved

Committee Reason:  There were multiple corrections expressed in a modification that the committee felt was too extensive. The wording in Section 507.4 is confusing. The committee urges that the corrections should be brought forward in a public comment. The collaborative effort, and inclusion of engineers in the effort, was a positive aspect for this proposal. (Vote: 10-1)

RB185: Approved As Modified

Committee Reason: The modification to Section R507.10.1.2 removed ‘approved’ because this adjective cannot be applied to manufacture’s instructions. The modification to Section to R507.10.2 reworded the two sentences for clarity. The modification to Section R507.10.4 removes ‘approved’ because this would be confusing to the homeowner. The proposal provided good general prescriptive language for guards that will reduce the need for engineering of guards. The committee had several suggestions for better wording that should come forward in a public comment: Add ‘also’ to Section R312.1.4; ‘design’ instead of ‘construction’ in Section 507.10; revise ‘prevent’ to ‘limit’ in Section R507.10.1.1; joists are part of the deck framing, so the language in Section R507.10.1 is confusing. (Vote: 9-2)

RB186: Approved As Modified

Committee Reason: The modification restores rivets and puts in the term ‘glulam’ to be consistent with the term used in ASTM F1667. Adding the Class D is appropriate for this product. (Vote: 11-0)

RB187: Approved As Submitted

Committee Reason: The committee felt that the overall proposal is a good reorganization that add clarity to the code requirements. Item 3 in Section R507.3.3 is an alternative means that is currently allowed in Chapter 1. (Vote: 11-0)

RB188: Approved As Submitted

Committee Reason: This revision will clarify the engineering option for deck beams where fastened together. (Vote: 11-0)

RB189: Approved As Submitted

Committee Reason: This change clarifies the cantilever limitations. (Vote: 11-0)

RB190: Approved As Submitted

Committee Reason: The proposed footnote allows for a design that does not use the full cantilever, which will allow for a more efficient design. If you do not use this option, the table is more conservative. The commentary should include an example. (Vote: 11-0)

RB191: Approved As Submitted

Committee Reason: The revisions add clarification to the code and allows for better design practice for wood decking. (Vote 11-0)


An Offer from NADRA Members Guild Quality and Best Pick Reports

7.3.19

Dear Fellow NADRA Members,

GuildQuality has some exciting news to share, and we’re seeking your support in helping spread the word!

We are proud to announce that our sister brand, Best Pick Reports, will expand into the greater Seattle area this fall. As a leader in the home services industry for the past twenty years, Best Pick Reports connects contractors with quality-focused customers through a unique model of contractor certification and vetting.

This expansion comes after extensive research into the nation’s top markets, as well as consultation with area contractors and home services professionals. The Puget Sound region needs a new model of lead generation that delivers quality above quantity. Best Pick Reports is poised to fill this gap as we have done in other major metro areas across the country.

With the support of GuildQuality’s tested model of customer research, which is one component of how contractors are vetted and verified, Best Pick Reports will create a hyper-local print and online directory of top-tier home services professionals in King, Snohomish, and Pierce counties. Our goal is to help contractors spend less effort weeding through price shoppers and more time connecting with ready-to-hire homeowners who ultimately become loyal customers.

NADRA members who may be interested to learn more about Best Pick Reports can visit us online at www.bestpickreports.com.  

Home services professionals in King, Snohomish, and Pierce counties are invited to apply for Best Pick Reports certification by contacting James Watson at marketing@bestpickreports.com, by calling (678) 274-6482, or by visiting www.bestpickreports.com/apply/seattle

Thanks for supporting this exciting new chapter of the GuildQuality/Best Pick Reports story.

Sincerely,

The Executive Teams at GuildQuality and Best Pick Reports

AZEK BUILDING PRODUCTS PARTNERS WITH GREAT SOUTHERN WOOD PRESERVING IN MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA

Chicago, Ill., May 17, 2019 – AZEK Building Products, a leading manufacturer of premium outdoor building materials, is excited to announced two new distribution centers, further developing its long-standing relationship with Great Southern Wood Preserving, Inc. The Alabama-based company will now offer full lines of TimberTech®and AZEK®Exteriors’ products at both its Rocky Mount, Virginia and Hagerstown, Maryland locations. 

“We are excited that our relationship with AZEK continues to grow and, along with it, our distribution footprint,” said Jimmy Rane, CEO of Great Southern Wood Preserving, Incorporated. “We believe that AZEK has the best product offerings and customer service in their industry, which ultimately gives homeowners, contractors, builders, dealers and architects outstanding solutions for their outdoor trim, decking, and railing needs.”

With the addition of these two facilities, AZEK Building Products and Great Southern now partner at 12 distribution centers across the United States. 

“We welcome the collaboration with Great Southern and look forward to developing our dealer network together in the Lower Mid-Atlantic market,” said Joe Ochoa, President of AZEK Building Products. “This strategic partnership will help accelerate growth in a market that is very important to us. We look forward to expanded visibility of our decking, railing and trim products in these areas.” 

With the industry’s widest selection of premium, capped composite and capped polymer decking colors and styles, AZEK Building Products is dedicated to manufacturing the most inspiring, sustainable and long-lasting outdoor building materials in the marketplace. For more information on AZEK Building Products, visit TimberTech.com and AZEKexteriors.com.

Great Southern Wood Preserving provides dealers with a broad range of traditional and alternative decking products, as well as additional treatment options, serving all user segments.

For more information on Great Southern Wood Preserving, visit www.yellawood.com

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About AZEK® Building Products

AZEK Building Products, a division of The AZEK Company, manufactures home building materials under two divisions: TimberTech® and AZEK® Exteriors. TimberTech offers a premium portfolio of capped polymer and capped composite decking – as well as railing, porch, lighting and paver products – while AZEK Exteriors manufactures distinctly unique trim and moulding. Together the brands present homeowners, builders, architects, dealers and contractors with a comprehensive suite of first-rate products that are long lasting, sustainable alternatives to wood. AZEK is headquartered in Chicago, IL (with plants in OH and PA) and also owns business operations of Minneapolis-based Ultralox railing systems. For more information visit AZEKCo.com or call 1-877-275-2935.

About Great Southern Wood Preserving, Incorporated:

Great Southern Wood Preserving, Incorporated is a wholly owned subsidiary of Great Southern Wood Holdings, Inc. The company is headquartered in Abbeville, AL. It and its subsidiaries have plants located in Mobile and Muscle Shoals, AL; Brookhaven, MS; Glenwood, AR; Columbus, TX;  Buckner, MO; Conyers and Jesup, GA; Mansura, LA; Bushnell, FL; Rocky Mount, VA; Hagerstown, MD; and Fombell, PA. For information, please call 334-585-2291 or visit www.yellawood.com. 

Tyler Rabel
Two by Four
312-445-4728
trabel@twoxfour.com


NADRA Code Update

May 8th, 2019

Notes from NADRA’s Code Committee Chair, Mark Guthrie:

Building codes are always going to play a critical part in the safety, growth and public perception of our industry.  NADRA recognizes this and has been dedicating an increasing amount of time and resources to better understanding and shaping the codes that we all must build to and live by.   A big part of this is our preparation and attendance at the ICC Code Hearings.

Last week, I attended the hearings along with our Technical Advisor Glenn Mathewson.  We spoke on behalf of NADRA, both “for” and “against” code proposals that have the potential to impact our future. In most cases, we were able to gain the support of the voting committee on the codes that we felt best represented the position of NADRA – safer decks built to reasonable, fact-based standards of construction.  

Other than the individual code items that we spoke to, the biggest win in my mind was that NADRA came away from this meeting as a more recognized and respected voice in a room full of the most influential and credentialed building industry professionals.  Glenn was well prepared to state our case supported by facts and passion on our behalf and it was recognized.

What follows are Glenn’s notes on the meetings.  It’s a great rundown of what we can look forward to in future codes and how to shape it with your help.  It’s well worth the read.

Update from Glenn Mathewson:

Last week, I had the honor of attending and speaking on behalf of NADRA at the International Code Council Committee Action Hearing for the creation of the 2021 International Residential Code.  

These hearings ran from 8am to 7pm, with every code topic imaginable being scrutinized, debated and voted on throughout the week.  Deck-specific proposals were scattered between more general ones. Keep in mind that many features inside a home, like stairs for instance, are also an important part of decks.  However, many proponents of change don’t necessarily realize how their proposals may impact our industry. I was there to consider and react to these, ready to defend the interests of our membership while still focusing on the deck related changes we had prepared for.

The code hearing process can be a little confusing but worth a quick explanation.  A volunteer committee of varied professionals at this stage considered testimony for and against the more than 300 modification proposals.   Their majority vote for approval or disapproval then set in motion the next phase where the public can submit changes to these proposals. All proposals that receive a public comment for modification will be deliberated again in the Final Action Hearings in October like last week’s meeting.  However, this time the final vote will be made by governmental ICC members made up mostly of local code officials from around the country.

There is still more work that needs to be done whether you agreed or disagreed with the votes taken last week.  A modification to a proposal that was approved by the committee only now requires a majority vote to become 2021 code.  To turn over a committee disapproval takes a 2/3rd majority. So, if you don’t agree with the committees vote this time, you better submit a public comment to help sway sentiment at the final hearings.  

Here is a rundown of the more significant deck-related proposals and what the committee felt about them:

RB46 & RB47 were the work of many in trying to separate guards and handrails into their own rows in the minimum live load table, and to better identify the loading direction that must be resisted.  Currently both must resist loads in all possible directions. Argument was delivered that a guard is for fall protection off an elevated floor surface and thus should not be required to be designed to support the same loads pulling back in toward the deck as those pushing out over the edge.  The committee disagreed and this one was a half win. Handrails and guards were split on the table, but the loading direction was unchanged. This is still a good first step that will allow future work to better identify the loads they must each resist.

RB50 was a serious proposal suggesting that all decks be built to a minimum 60 psf live load, rather than the current 40 psf.  However, to achieve this, the proposal required a using the 70 psf snow load tables in a different proposal by NADRA and the Deck Code Coalition (DCC).  Luckily, after much deliberation, the committee decided this was not appropriate and the proposal was disapproved. After the decision, I reached out to the proponent and invited them to discuss their concerns in deck live loads with us.  There are many with ideas and experience in decks and they cannot be dismissed. NADRA stands by collaboration as the only way to appropriately develop the future codes of our industry.

RB106 suggested a strict method of constructing stairs, including stringer cuts, spans and spacing, securing to a concrete landing, and details for connecting the stairs at the top.  The proposal is not a surprise, as the absence structural code provisions for how to build stairs is well known. However, the suggestions in RB106 just didn’t represent very much flexibility and needed more work.  We spoke against this proposal and it was disapproved.

There were many other proposals with minor impacts that we spoke to in support and opposition, and in nearly all cases the committee voted in the manner we had hoped.  On the last full day of testimony, the proposals that NADRA and the DCC have spent months developing were heard.

RB184 was our largest proposal and offered new design tables for sizing deck structural members.  The new tables expanded the current 40 psf live load to 50, 60 and 70 psf snow loads options.  This would allow many more regions to use the prescriptive design method in the IRC. This proposal also included critical alterations to the footing table, such as reducing the minimum 14-inch diameter pier currently in the IRC to as small as 8-inch diameter for small decks and stair landings.  It also expanded the post-sizing table to include the actual area of the deck supported and various wood species. Unfortunately, some last minute engineering tweaks had to be made to the table that was submitted and the committee didn’t feel they had sufficient time to review them. They disapproved it.  Luckily, there were no negative statements made in committee discussions and no opposition testimony. The committee encouraged us to submit the revisions as public comment so they can be thoroughly reviewed. Other attendees at the hearing, not affiliated with the DCC, stood and spoke in favor of our proposal.  There is still hope for a strong vote of approval in the Final Action Hearings.

RB185 was the most collaborated proposal of all from the DCC, as it was related to guard post installation.  Working with the many parties in the DCC, there have always been very differing opinions about how specific guard construction should be detailed in the IRC.  After much argument, disagreement, and sharing of knowledge, the members of the DCC were able to respect each other and all agree on a minimum proposal to make a step forward in safer guard construction.  We agreed to prohibit the notching of 4×4 posts and to include code language requiring a post to be secured into the adjacent framing of the deck, not just the single rim board. However, no specific hardware was specified, keeping the code generic and flexible.  The committee congratulated us a number of times for the professional manner in which we worked together. The proposal was approved.

RB187 was a pretty simple proposal to make better sense of various deck foundation types, minimum depths, and frost depth exceptions.  With the committee approval of this proposal, the code will be better presented. One clarification made was that decks attached to non-frost-protected structures, such as detached garages or sheds, will not have to themselves be frost protected.

RB190 is a proposal that makes beam design for decks much more flexible.  The current table in the IRC for sizing beams is based on the span of the joist supported by the beam, but it assumes those joists are at their maximum allowable cantilever beyond the beam.  For decks with flush beams and no cantilevered joists, the maximum beam span is incredibly conservative. We proposed a footnote modification method that will allow the table to be more flexible and alter the values based on the lesser amount of cantilever.  The example used in the proposal showed how a beam without cantilevered joists was still being limited to a maximum 7 foot 4 inches, but with our new footnote modification would actually be able to span 9 feet. The committee agreed that this was a much-needed flexibility to the table and approved our proposal.

RB 191 is a proposal based in truth, though it may not be something deck builders will be thrilled about.  None-the-less, our reputation as contributors to the code development process must remain grounded in what is most appropriate for the industry.  The maximum joists spacing of different thicknesses of wood decking is derived from an analysis method that assumes each board is spanning at least two joist bays, bearing on three joists.  This is not currently explained in the code. The provisions we proposed maintained the maximum joists spacing for decking supported on at least three joists, but reduced the maximum spacing for decking supported by only two joists.  For these short lengths, the maximum joist spacing will be approximately half. Revealing this oversight in the code maintains a high level of professionalism in our industry, yet also allowed us to craft the code in a manner that provides more assurance for sound construction, while also allowing for design freedom..

RB302 was our final proposal and it was related to the guard design collaboration.  To address concerns of building departments that have no way to approve simple, basic guard designs while not hindering the professional builders from unique guard designs, a new appendix chapter was proposed.  IRC appendix chapters must be adopted individually by a jurisdiction and are not automatically part of the mandatory code. Where not adopted, they can still be referenced as an approved manner for construction.  The proposal included specific methods for attaching guard posts that have been engineered to support the 200 lb. required design load. Assuming the committee would agree that guards don’t need to support a 200 lb. inward load, that load was not specifically addressed.  Unfortunately, that assumption was incorrect, and the committee did not approve the appendix proposal.

Overall, the contributions of NADRA and the DCC were an overwhelming success.  Our voice was heard, respected, and made a difference. It’s a voice that we can’t allow to ever go silent.  The IRC will be modified every three years, as will the IBC and the swimming pool and spa code (ISPSC), both of which have implications on decks.  There will always be a need for the deck industry to stand and speak. We have made a great impression, but there is still much work to be done to complete the 2021 IRC.

Congratulations to us all on this success,

Glenn Mathewson, MCP – NADRA Technical Advisor.

NADRA Code Update

ICC Committee Action Hearings, Group B Codes – Albuquerque, 2019:

May 2nd, 2019 Update – By: Glenn Mathewson

Deep into the IRC Committee Action Hearings. So far the deck industry has been well represented by The North American Deck and Railing Association and our friends in the Deck Code Coalition.

Preview of our accomplishments as the voice for our industry:

  • Guard and handrail load requirements were approved to be split into two columns which sets the stag to better evaluate the unique job they each do.
  • Raising the minimum design live load for decks from 40 psf to 60 psf was disapproved.

This is just the beginning of the process though, as public comments and the Final Action hearing can still change everything, MUCH work is still to be done. Please consider making a pledge today to help NADRA continue to have representation at these critical hearings. Learn more about our fundraising initiative HERE.

Today will be another long 11-hour day of testimony, but I’m proud to be here speaking on behalf of NADRA and for all those that work in decks and rails!

NADRA Provides Deck Safety Marketing Resources to Help the Industry Boost Business this Spring

Contact: Michael Beaudry
Phone: 215-679-4884
Email: Info@NADRA.org

In honor of Deck Safety Month®, the North American Decking and Railing Association reminds professionals to take advantage of exclusive Deck Safety Marketing Resources along with press release templates, graphics, ads, social media content, flyers, and more.

Quakertown, PA  (May 1st, 2019) – With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired. This means big business opportunities for deck builders, remodelers, inspectors and contractors to promote deck inspections, ensuring homeowner safety while simultaneously building their own brand. The North American Decking and Railing Association (NADRA) offers industry professionals and inspectors a breadth of resources, including a comprehensive toolkit, marketing materials, and inspection checklists.

“May is Deck Safety Month®-along with prime outdoor living season-and that presents a perfect chance for savvy pros to market their business,” says NADRA executive vice president Michael Beaudry. “NADRA has created an array of tools to help you take advantage of this marketing opportunity. Whatever you do-even if it means simply rechecking your own deck-be sure to pay special attention to deck safety”

NADRA offers the following resources for building professionals & inspector members to leverage during Deck Safety Month® and throughout the year, including:

  • Deck Safety Month® Toolkit. This NADRA-member benefits include:
    • Deck Safety Month® Logo
    • Check Your Deck® Logo
    • 2019 Deck Safety Ambassador Logo (for official ambassadors only) learn more here about the ambassador program
    • 10-point consumer checklist
    • Link to online deck inspection form
    • Social media content for your use
    • Customizable press release templates
    • Customizable flyer all about deck safety
    • Customizable social media, infographics, and web graphics
    • Tips and guidelines to make the most out of Deck Safety Month®
  • Deck Evaluation Form: A step-by-step guide to evaluating the integrity of the deck structure, stairs, surface, and railings. A downloadable form and online form (BETA) are available to members and non-members.
  • Certified inspector program: NADRA has partnered with the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) to create the NADRA Deck Inspection Certification Course, an ASHI-approved continuing education program. Having certification can not only improve a contractor’s skill-set, but make them more marketable to consumers.
  • Deck Safety Ambassadors: Help spread the word about deck safety by becoming a Deck Safety Ambassador. Sponsors gain access to an exclusive Ambassador logo and marketing benefits to further promote their businesses.
  • Homeowner resources: Builders can download the 10-Point Deck Safety Consumer Checklist to pass along to customers. Though not a replacement for a professional deck inspection, the checklist can assist homeowners and provide reference during other times of the year.

“Communicating safe decking standards remains a top priority for NADRA,” Beaudry says. “We continue to focus our efforts on educating both pros and consumers on proper deck installation practices as well as on consistent deck inspections. At the same time, we know that deck safety offers professionals in the industry a great opportunity to market their business, so we’ve provided all of the tools to help them do just that.”

Visit NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety resources for industry  professionals. *You must be a current NADRA member to access the “toolkit”. Join NADRA today.

About NADRA:

The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of deck builders, inspectors, and manufacturers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. www.NADRA.org

© Copyright 2019 North American Deck and Railing Association. All rights reserved.

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May is Deck Safety Month®

Contact: Michael Beaudry
Phone: 215-679-4884
Email: Info@NADRA.org

Love Spending Time Outdoors? NADRA Encourages you to Check Your Deck®

During Deck Safety Month® and throughout the year, homeowners can take advantage of resources and tools from the North American Decking and Railing Association to ensure the security and longevity of their decks.

Quakertown, PA –  (April 30th, 2019) –  May is Deck Safety Month ® , the perfect time for homeowners to ensure their decks are in top condition for the season ahead. The North American Decking and Railing Association (NADRA) invites consumers to Check Your Deck ®  using resources such as the 10-Point Consumer Checklist.

With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired. “It’s crucial for homeowners to verify the integrity of their deck to ensure user safety as well as help extend the deck’s life-span, improve appearance, and increase livability,” says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of NADRA. “We’re proud to offer an array of tools to help consumers check their decks as well as connect with building professionals with the know-how to identify and remedy potential problems.”

Consumers can visit NADRA.org to take advantage of resources to Check Your Deck ® , including:

10-Point Checklist: Homeowners can download the 10-Point Deck Safety Consumer Checklist , a step-by-step guide to visually inspecting the deck for safety concerns such as corroding fasteners, decaying materials, loose railings, inadequate lighting, and more. Though not a replacement for a professional deck inspection, the checklist is a helpful tool to assist homeowners.

Find an Inspector: NADRA and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) offer building professionals the NADRA Deck Inspection Certification Course, which certifies the recipient has undergone training specific to conducting proper, thorough deck inspections. Consumers can search for a certified inspector in their area by browsing the Inspectors Directory here.

Find a Builder: NADRA deck builders adhere to a strict code of ethics and are required to submit proof of licensing and insurance as required by their state. Homeowners can search for qualified deck builders at www.NADRA.org.

Visit NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources.

About NADRA:

The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of deck builders, inspectors, and manufacturers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. www.NADRA.org

© Copyright 2019 North American Deck and Railing Association. All rights reserved.

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