A few questions to ask yourself, Tips from NADRA

March is here, and that means we’re entering “Home Show Season”. It’s the end of the winter, the early customers are calling and inquiring. Now is our last chance to button-up any policies, procedures, and give our companies one last “spring cleaning” before the rush!

 

A few questions to ask yourself:

  1. Is there any last-minute education to wrap up?
  2. Are all of our vendor agreements in place?
  3. Are your trucks and trailers lettered and in good shape?
  4. Are you displaying the NADRA logo and pledge on your marketing materials? (stand out from the competition!)
  5. Are your business cards printed with updated industry certifications and social media information?
  6. Do you have marketing pieces ready?
  7. Jobsite signs in good shape?
  8. Crew T-shirts and hats stocked?
  9. Do you have a good camera for your before and after pictures? Or is this the year to consider adding a drone?
  10. How is the website, email signature, and voicemail greetings?

If you don’t have these things ready, you have time, but that time is now! Go get it done. You’ll feel better prepared, and at the end of the day, you’ll know you did everything you could to be ready for the season.If you’re wondering where to get the best job-site signs, or you’re not sure where to order your T-shirts, don’t forget to reach out to your fellow NADRA members to ask. That’s what we are here for! Ask away. Use NADRA’s social media platforms to ask questions, hop on LinkedIn to start a discussion, Tweet! Use whatever platform makes it easy for you to ask your question. It’s human nature to want to help. Someone will answer you. Use your NADRA network to better your business. We are here for you.

Your NADRA Board of Directors, and Home Office staff are here to help. Feel free to call or email any of us, if we can assist in any way.

Sincerely,

Your NADRA Board of Directors

The Resiliency Secret – Ssh!…

Okay my friends, let’s cut to the chase!  The key to being resilient is to recognize that if we live long enough, we will eventually face change or adversity.  In addition, since we are all human, we understand that these state of affairs automatically trigger several types of emotions.  However, the secret sauce lies within how we handle these emotions ourselves and how we deal with the emotions of those around us when either change or adversity strikes.

Here’s a quick example.  Think back to when you first learned how to ride a bike.  The person who taught you took off your training wheels, held you on the bike steady for about a minute, gave you a pep talk and very specific instructions and then eventually provided you with a swift push to get you started.  At first, your excitement level went through the roof.  Your big smile indicated that you welcomed this new adventure.  Your confidence, passion and perseverance kicked in immediately.  You experienced immediate success by pedaling five times without issue and then the inevitable happened…  You fell!  Not only did you fall, but you fell really hard (because falling was never an issue with the training wheels attached).

At this point, your natural inclination was to immediately look around to see who experienced your fall.  But there was also another very important reason you were looking around to find this person.  You desperately wanted to know what their reaction was to your mishap.  Were they disappointed, upset, happy, proud, supportive, empathetic, etc.?  Whether you knew it or not, your reaction to the fall was 95% dictated by the first emotional response of someone around you.  If they overacted, so did you.  If they were laughing with you, you tended to laugh as well.

This is a very simple concept that leaders must understand and work diligently on today.  As we experience more and more change and adversity in our lives, we must train our minds to master resilience by conquering our emotional responses.  Similarly, with self-awareness, we must understand that the responses of others around us should not necessarily influence our mental toughness, positive outlook and resilience.

The goal for all of us is to go from certainty to hope as quickly and often as we can.  The secret to resiliency starts and ends with how we respond.

The goal of leadership is to realize that we are all human and that we have a responsibility to our tribe to take them on this same journey.  Work tirelessly to minimize the disruption time within your organizations, families and life. Oh, and by the way, this is a secret that you can share with everyone. Please do! Good luck on your personal journey my friends!

 

 

By: , Positivity Guru, Value Adder and Keynote Speaker

We will become what we magnify

We will become what we magnify!

By: Kevin Jackson

 

Let’s be honest, we’ve all heard, you are what you eat. However, no one talks about you will become what you magnify. So, let’s take a few minutes to challenge our thinking.

Consider this:

  • Negativity will always breed negativity. Positive thinking is an everyday choice that will change the outcome of your life, your decisions and your success.
  • Hate will always generate more hate. Whether you hate a person, place or thing, this is a conscience decision that carries residual effects. If a state of love for something or someone seems out of the question, take baby steps to better understand, to better communicate or to better accept flexibility and change.
  • Always provide value. If you are not providing value you are not providing anything! Magnify the “what’s in it for me” for your customers, your clients, your friends, your spouse, your families and your communities. Never directly sell anything, but always solve problems, fill voids and change lives and situations for the better.
  • Magnify abundance over lack, but realize true abundance is not often what society leads us to believe it is. Live life with open palms. Give freely, but with discernment. Share your talents, your time, your gifts, your passion and your purpose. Did you know that true abundance is deeply rooted in contentment? News flash!! The world and what it offers is not all about you. When you give with the right heart, many things will be given back to you, magnified!

These small pointers, along with your commitment to continuous improvement every day will take you further to living within your purpose, possibility and promise.

As we welcome in 2017, I wish you nothing but peace, perseverance and prosperity. Always remember that we decide what we magnify and what we magnify is what we will become! Choose wisely my friends.

Steve Shields talks about AWPA Modifications

I appreciated the opportunity to participate in the treated wood panel discussion at the recent NADRA meeting.  It provided an opportunity to discuss recent changes to standards that have impacted not only how treated wood is recommended to be used, but have also encouraged more retailers to stock ground contact treated wood so that users can be less concerned about potential misapplication.  Just as important was the opportunity for me to hear comments directly from builders on shortcomings of the treated wood that they have experienced.  I believe that increased involvement of NADRA and other organizations representing retailers and users of treated wood in AWPA can result in continued improvement of standards and better treated wood products for users.

There are new rules for building decks and using treated wood.  Just as the American Wood Council updated its “Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide” in 2014 with new recommendations and methods, the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) has updated its standards with new information on how treated wood is to be used.  As associations involved with developing code requirements or standards that are referenced in the codes, both are continually looking for ways to improve the methods and materials used in wood deck construction.

AWPA is recognized by ANSI as a consensus standard writing organization and its standards are referenced in the International Building Code and International Residential Code.

Products not specifically listed in AWPA standards often use ICC Evaluation Service product reports as a means to demonstrate that products comply with the requirements of the codes.

AWPA has updated standard U1 and now requires that for use of sawn lumber in certain above ground applications that are either (1) subject to ground contact type hazards or (2) critical to the structure and difficult to replace now be treated for ground contact.  These applications include:

a) When there is a reasonable expectation that soil, vegetation, leaf litter or other debris may build up and remain in contact with the component.

b) When the construction itself, other structures or anticipated vegetation growth will not allow air to circulate underneath the construction and between decking boards.

c) When components are installed less than six inches above ground (final grade after landscaping) and supported on permeable building materials (e.g. treated wood or concrete).

d) When components are in direct contact with non-durable untreated wood, or any older construction with any evidence of decay.

e) When components are wetted on a frequent or recurrent basis (e.g., on a freshwater floating dock or by a watering system).

f) When components are used in tropical climates

AWPA M4 requires that treated wood that has been cut, drilled or damaged including abrasions or holes from removal of nails and spikes should be field treated with preservative.  While this has seldom been done in the central and eastern United States, it has been common practice on the west coast and in Canada.  Field treatment helps to protect the interior of the wood which has less treatment than the outer shell.

Preservative end cut solutions shall be used in accordance with the instructions and precautions listed on the product label. Acceptable end cut solutions for outdoor projects referenced in the M4 standard include:

(a) Copper naphthenate. Preferably containing 2.0% copper metal; 1.0% is OK if the higher in not available.

(b) Oxine copper. Containing a minimum 0.675% oxine copper (0.12% copper metal).

If suitable products cannot be found locally, an Amazon search for wood preservatives will give a number of options for copper naphthenate products.  Using the link http://www.chemtch.com/outlast-q8-pressure-treated-wood will take you to the supplier of the oxine copper product in quarts, gallons or 5 gallon pails.  While somewhat more expensive it is clear and has little odor.

AWPA M4 also requires that timbers used as columns should have an original factory end in the ground and that the top be field treated with preservative.

These changes to AWPA have encouraged many retailers to make ground contact treated wood available to their customers.  Builders requesting ground contact treatment will help to ensure this practice continues and provide you with a supply of treated wood product that will be durable regardless of the specific application.

Stephen C. Shields

Steve spent over 43 years in the wood preservation industry with Koppers Company and successor organizations until his retirement as Technical Director of Lonza’s wood protection business in May 2016.  He remains active in the industry, providing technical consulting services as the principal of Wood Protection Consulting, LLC.

He graduated from Pennsylvania State University in 1972 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Wood Science and Technology and from Akron University in 1982 with a Masters in Business Administration.

Steve’s experience includes sales and customer support for preservative and fire retardant products, product development and research, technical product and plant production support, quality control, code and standards development and technical writing. He has been an active member of many associations including the American Wood Protection Association (1984- ), International Code Congress (and predecessor code organizations 1985- ), National Institute of Building Sciences, Wood Protection Council (1990-93) and the Western Wood Preservers Institute (1994 – 2016).

His primary activities now focus on American Wood Protection Association standard development and task group activities and building code evaluation reports.  He recently was awarded the American Wood Protection Association, Award of Merit for his service and contributions to the organization.

Koppers’, Todd Greer talks about AWPA Modifications

It was great to meet and speak directly with NADRA members at the Atlanta meeting. We look forward to working with the organization, and encouraging communication within our industry. Koppers believes it is important to provide a unified source of information for deck building professionals to learn more about the use of treated wood products and technologies.

The main reason for the new Standard change is to address misuse of ABOVE GROUND treated wood products.  ABOVE GROUND treated products shall not be used in ground contact, or subjected to hazards comparable to ground contact. If components such as a deck joist, or support beam are critical to the performance and safety of the system and would be difficult to maintain, repair or replace, then those components shall be treated to GROUND CONTACT Standard. ABOVE GROUND treated wood products, regardless of the preservative system, will perform only in “above ground” end use applications. Applying a little bit of common sense and good judgment will in most cases, lead to the logical and safest conclusion; that joists and beams in the majority of decks and fresh water docks should be treated to the GROUND CONTACT Standard.

  • In February of this year, the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) passed a U1 Standard change affecting above ground and ground contact treated wood products.
  • This Standard change officially became effective in July 2016, when the AWPA Book of Standards was published.
  • The new Standard change is affecting treated wood purchasing practices of home centers and lumberyards throughout the U.S. Many retailers are now ordering ground contact treated 2” lumber and decking to meet the new requirements.
  • The new AWPA Standard change is not confusing or hard to apply.
  • The AWPA Book of Standards states, “AWPA Standard U1 is the primary standard for specifiers, such as architects and engineers, but also for end users and building code officials. This Standard contains the information needed by specifiers in order to select a product that best suits their needs.”
  • The AWPA Standard change establishes new guidelines for when wood shall be treated to the UC4A Ground Contact General Use category in situations that simulate ground contact, such as:
  • When there is a reasonable expectation that soil, vegetation, leaf litter or other debris may build up and remain in contact with the component.
  • When the construction itself, other structures or anticipated vegetation growth will not allow air flow to circulate underneath the construction and between decking boards.
  • When components are installed less than six inches above ground (final grade after landscaping) and supported on permeable building materials (e.g. treated wood or concrete).
  • When components are in direct contact with non-durable untreated wood, or any older construction with any evidence of decay.
  • When components are wetted on a frequent or reoccurring basis (e.g. on a freshwater floating dock or by a watering system)
  • When components are used in tropical climates.
  • In addition, the new AWPA Standard states that above ground wood components, including joists and beams for decks and fresh water docks, shall be treated to Ground Contact UC4A when they would be:
  • Difficult to maintain, repair, or replace; and
  • Critical to the performance and safety of the entire system.
  • Applying a little bit of common sense and good judgment will, in most cases, will lead to the logical — and safest — conclusion that joists and beams in the majority of decks and fresh water docks shall be treated to the Ground Contact Standard.
  • The bottom line is that if a deck joist and/or a support beam are critical to the performance and safety of the system and would be difficult to maintain, repair or replace, then wood treated to the Ground Contact Standard shall be used.
  • Above Ground treated wood products, regardless of the preservative system, will perform only in “above ground” end use applications.
  • The main reason for the new Standard change is to address misuse of above ground treated wood used in ground contact or in applications that are physically above ground but are subject to hazards comparable to ground contact exposures or are used in applications involving components that are critical to safety and performance and will be difficult to maintain, repair or replace.
  • The new Standard change will help address the misuse of above ground treated wood products.

To learn more, please visit: www.kopperspc.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Greer

Todd Greer is the Director of North American Sales and Service for Koppers Performance Chemicals. His experience in the treated lumber industry includes 21 years with Timber Products Inspection, both in the field and in management of several programs.  Todd joined the Koppers team to focus on Customer Development and Quality Control.

Viance’s, Chris Kollwitz talks about AWPA Modifications

We wanted to thank the entire NADRA organization for the opportunity to meet with some of the leading deck builders in the industry, at NADRA’s regional meeting in Atlanta.

As beautiful custom wood framed decks and outdoor projects are constructed by NADRA members, they should be guided by the latest, most accurate information available.

Recent updates to the 2016 American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) Use Category System for treated wood, which include modifications to the section that outlines proper applications of Above Ground (UC3B) and Ground Contact (UC4A) treated wood, are causing some confusion in the industry.

Unfortunately, some retailers and wood treatment companies have misinterpreted the language to mean that only ground contact lumber meets the updated AWPA Use Category System standard for deck framing applications. That is not the case.

When it comes to residential decks projects, here’s what you need to know.

  • Despite what some in the industry are communicating, the AWPA U1 Use Category System (UCS), and the IRC® and IBC® building codes continue to allow Above Ground (UC3B) treated wood for common deck applications.
  • There is NO requirement to use Ground Contact materials for ALL Above Ground decks.
  • Above Ground (UC3B) wood treated under the AWPA U1 standards remains Code Compliant for deck framing, joists, beams, decking surfaces and railing systems, while using the appropriate amount of preservatives required to protect the wood from decay and termite attack.
  • Look for the CheckMark® on treated wood end tags. Only wood treated to the AWPA standards is third-party inspected and bears the CheckMark® of quality on end tags. Be sure to use products endorsed with the CheckMark logo.
  • Viance has reaffirmed its warranty coverage on treated wood products, and will continue to extend the terms of its Lifetime Limited Warranty for Above Ground (UC3B) treated wood products when used properly.
  • The preservative levels required to meet the AWPA UC4A ground contact standard not only increases the likelihood of higher project expense through more expensive wood, it also increases the chemical needed to complete projects. Above ground treated wood remains code compliant for most common decking applications while using the appropriate amount of preservative to ensure performance. Why use more chemicals than necessary?

To learn more about the revisions to the AWPA-UCS standard and why Above Ground treatments are still the best choice in treated wood, visit www.treatedwood.com/options. Viance is an ICC Preferred Education Provider and offers an accredited Continuing Education Course (CEU) course: Code Compliant Treated Wood for Residential Deck Construction

We are happy to review any questions you may have, email them to codequestions@viance.net.

Thank you

Chris Kollwitz

Christopher Kollwitz

Viance – Treated Wood Solutions

Director of Marketing

NADRA member since 2009

Contact Info:

Email: ckollwitz@viance.net

Office: 800-421-8661

 Over 30 Years Building Products Sales and Marketing with a focus on process improvement, product training, merchandising, events and business development programs.

  • 8 Years with Hechinger Co. in Washington DC
  • 14 years with Georgia-Pacific Building Products
  • 8 years with Viance – Treated Wood Solutions.
  • Currently responsible for the development and management of Viance marketing initiatives and execution.

NADRA Education at RIDIJ 2016, Baltimore

What: ND01 – Deck Evaluation/ Inspection Certification Class for Industry Professionals

When: Wednesday, October 5th from 8am – 12pm. Presenter: Jim Mailey.

Cost: NADRA Member Price: $99  / Non-Member Price: $199

This four-hour session will teach the home inspector how to safely inspect a deck using the NADRA Deck Evaluation checklist. This checklist has been developed specifically for home inspectors as a comprehensive tool to be used to properly assess the safety of a deck. At the conclusion of this session, the home inspector will understand how to analyze the following deck components and issues: stairs, footings and posts, joists, joist connections, girders, ledger connections, deck boards, handrail assemblies and guards, recognize proper and improper fasteners, assess hardware or material corrosion, and review the safety standards of all (decks, stairs, guards) structures.

What: ND02 – A Trip Down the Load Path: Updated to 2015 IRC Provisions

When: Wednesday, October 5th from 1pm – 5pm. Presenter: Glenn Mathewson.

Cost: NADRA Member Price: $99  / Non-Member Price: $199

Now updated with all the new 2015 IRC provisions, this course completes the load path started in course 2, Ledgers and Lateral Loads. Decking, joists, beams, posts, foundations and even properties of the earth are covered, so that the entire structural system and related codes can be understood. This course also covers the topics in the NADRA Master Deck Professional-Codes 2015 certification renewal!

Upon completion of this course, attendees will…

Understand the basics of proper deck foundation design and construction.
Comprehend the concept of a load path and how forces are transferred through a structure.
Learn of various standards and sources for validating a deck’s structural system, but without an engineer.

Registration: You can register right here on NADRA’s online event registration portal.

Register Now

AWPA U1 Standard Revisions Appealed

 

AWPA U1 Standard Revisions Appealed Due To Lack of Data and Data Omission

Sunbelt Forest Products Appeal AWPA U1 Standard Revisions; Requests Changes Be Rescinded

May 31, 2016, 09:00 ET from Sunbelt Forest Products

 

BARTOW, Fla., May 31, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Sunbelt Forest Products has announced that it will file, this week, an appeal of the American Wood Protection Association’s (AWPA’s) recent revisions to the U1 standard for above ground outdoor wood applications. The revision recommends the use of ground contact lumber for outdoor structure components that are “difficult to maintain, repair or replace and are critical to the performance and safety of the entire system construction.”

The appeal to the AWPA’s Executive Committee will be based on the fact that important technical data on product performance was omitted during the presentation on the proposed change.

“The proponents of these changes violated Section 5.5 of the AWPA Technical Committee Regulations requiring revisions be based upon relevant and adequate supporting data and Section 7.3, which requires that proposals to adjust standards be accompanied by a written statement that relevant data was not omitted,” said Ken DelleDonne president of Sunbelt Forest Products. During the presentation, proponents (which use a micronized copper azole treatment system for above ground lumber) showed photos of structural failures with above ground treated wood that they claimed were representative of widespread problems. They did not present actual statistical data to back up these claims, however.

“But this spring, when these same proponents were seeking to have micronized treatment standardized by the AWPA, they were suddenly able to produce data showing its efficacy in above ground applications.  This was in direct contrast to the statements they made during the consideration of the revision, and would have likely materially impacted the outcome of the proposal consideration,” DelleDonne added.

“This was four-year-old data that they certainly were familiar with before the submission of the proposal to modify the U1 standard and that should have been presented during the consideration of its revision,” DelleDonne said.  “According to AWPA bylaws, if data is withheld the proponent should be advised to either provide written explanation as to why the data was withheld or to resubmit the proposal at a later date to include relevant data.”

Any explanation for the data omission would be suspect, he said. “It seems highly unlikely that the same proponent who had only pictures to show during the revision presentation was unaware of the existence of this data that would have created legitimate concerns about the need for any changes in the U1 standard.”

“If the AWPA is going to remain the standard bearer for the pressure treated industry, it must recognize the questions about the validity of these important guidelines, questions that are raised by the omission of key existing data, whether intentional or accidental,” DelleDonne said. “The AWPA’s responsibility is to get the standards right on an industry-changing guideline like this one. We need to reconsider the proposal with all the facts, not just a few pieces of select information.”

Causes for concern: Commercialization, environmental impact and unnecessary costs

Sunbelt Forest Products is also expressing some misgivings about the possible commercialization of the AWPA U1 standard by members who could benefit from the changes. DelleDonne said the issue is important because the revised U1 ground contact standards have caused confusion in the industry and have caused unwarranted price increases. They could also be harmful to the environment long term.

“Some retailers and wood treatment companies appear to be under the mistaken impression that all treated wood used in outdoor applications must meet ground contact standards. But this is not the case,” he continued. Most recently, the AWPA T1 Education Task Force, a subgroup of the Technical Committee, worked in conjunction with the Softwood Lumber Board and Western Wood Preservers Institute to produce an infographic on the recent U1 standard revision that shows very clearly that joists and beams can use lumber treated to UC3B above ground, exterior construction standards.

Despite this graphic, certain producers and suppliers are forcing their retail and contractor customers to switch to all ground-contact wood because they say it is required by the AWPA revision. When only ground contact wood is available, retailers and contractors are forced to pay higher costs not only for the more heavily treated lumber but also for the more robust fasteners required with such wood. There are also environmental concerns, since ground contact lumber contains more copper than wood treated for above ground use.

“Large treaters, representing 70% of the total market, have used this revision as the basis for forcing their customers to all ground contact material, resulting in a 15% increase or more in retail prices,” DelleDonne said. “The rationale for the revisions was said to be misapplication of above ground treated products by consumers, however, our data shows misapplication occurs significantly less than 1% annually, making the revisions unnecessary and a costly correction to a problem that occurs once out of millions of successful installations.”

He also noted that even if there is a problem, it may be related to the type of treatment used for above ground wood. Companies that treat wood with Ecolife, ACQ and CAC have not experienced the quantity of problems that the non- AWPA standardized micronized treatment customers are reporting with their above ground lumber.

There are also concerns about the adoption of the revised AWPA standard by the International Building Code (IBC) and the International Residential Code (IRC). Both serve as the basis for state and local building codes in the U.S. and both reference AWPA Standard U1 in their requirements for deck construction.

“We are on a slippery slope of adding significant cost and environmental implications to the entire building construction industry on a revision based entirely upon irrelevant, incomplete data,” said DelleDonne. “The whole issue needs more discussion–and discussion backed this time by all available hard data.”

Specific requests in appeal

Sunbelt Forest Products will formally request several actions in its appeal of the revision to the Executive Committee:

  • Rescind the AWPA Standard U1 2015 revisions relating to above ground and ground contact due to lack of relevant data and procedural abeyance resulting from data omission
  • Resubmit the revision proposal at a later date including ALL relevant data.
  • Immediately withdraw, prior to official printing, the U1 2015 revisions relating to above ground contact from the AWPA’s 2016 Book of Standards
  • Notify the ICC to withdraw ICC AC326 Revisions as the AWPA U1 standard is in question due to data omission and lack of relevant data.
  • Notify the IBC and IRC that the revisions to AWPA U1 standard is in question due to data omission and lack of relevant data.

The AWPA by-laws state the Executive Committee will give written notification of its decision. Given the immediate ramifications of the proposed revisions, Sunbelt Forest Products is going to request expedited consideration of its appeal.

Sunbelt Forest Products of Bartow, Florida, a wholly owned subsidiary of PalletOne, Inc., is one of the largest pressure treaters in the Southeast. Operating three locations in Alabama and Florida, Sunbelt’s manufacturing capabilities exceed 300 million board feet of pressure treated wood per year.

 

SOURCE Sunbelt Forest Products

 

Deck Safety Tips for Homeowners

News Release

Contact: Michael Beaudry
NADRA Executive VP
215-679-4884
Info@NADRA.org 

May is Deck Safety Month® – Deck Safety Tips for Homeowners

QUAKERTOWN, PA – The North American Deck and Railing Association declared May as Deck Safety Month®. NADRA’s Campaign for deck safety awareness is an effort to promote outdoor living in a beautiful and safe environment. During Deck Safety Month® the experts at NADRA are offering safety tips for homeowners and encouraging you to Check Your Deck®.

“It’s springtime and we all want to get out and enjoy our decks,” says Bob Lett, vice president of national sales for WOLF Home Products. “NADRA wants to help keep homeowners safe. Deck maintenance means so much more than just cleaning your deck. It means making sure your entire deck structure is in good, safe order. Just like your car, you need to evaluate, ‘tune up’ and keep your deck in safe operating condition on a regular basis. These checklists from NADRA can help you do just that.”

A key element to enjoying your deck for years to come is making sure it is safe. NADRA’s “10-Point Consumer Safety Checklist” is an efficient way to take a good look at the different parts of your deck, with an eye to what might need maintenance, repair or replacement. The checklist can be found at http://bit.ly/NADRA10PointConsumerChecklist.

Homeowners should consider a professional deck inspection. “A professional inspector will thoroughly examine your deck, provide information on your deck’s capacity limits, identify any dangerous problem areas and give you some insight of what to keep your eye on in the future,” says Beaudry. NADRA provides industry professionals with a Deck Evaluation Form that is available here: http://bit.ly/NADRADeckEvaluationForm, along with a new online Deck Evaluation Form (Beta Test). This is the latest iteration of NADRA’s Deck Evaluation Form. It’s easy to use and allows deck professionals the ability to save and print deck inspection results. The online form includes inspection items such as stairs, footings, beams/joists, ledger, boards/surface, rails/guards and more. Visit CheckYourDeck.org to test it out.

“We recommend ASHI-certified home inspectors or a knowledgeable deck builder for inspections of older decks,” says Beaudry. “Our NADRA member deck builders are required to adhere to a code of ethics and comply with state licensing and insurance requirements. This brings peace of mind to homeowners using our NADRA members.”

Deck inspection requires special knowledge, expertise and experience. To find a professional deck builder and inspector, please visit www.NADRA.org.

The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is dedicated to increasing public awareness of the necessity for regular inspection and maintenance of existing decks and proper installation of new decks. For more information visit www.NADRA.org

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Simpson Strong-Tie Presents FREE Training Workshop

Simpson Strong-Tie Presents a FREE Training Workshop with CEU’s in King of Prussia, PA

Tuesday, October 27th at 7:00am

Deck and Porch Workshop:

This FREE workshop is designed for those Engineers, Architects, Building Officials, Contractors, Distributors, Deck Builders, and Home Inspectors interested in learning about bringing structural safety to deck building.

Continuing Education Credits: 

  • 6 Professional Development Hours (PDH) awarded
  • Continued Education Units (CEU) 6 contact hours, are offered to those who meet our workshop completion requirements. You must also attain a passing grade on the online test association with this workshop, if you are required to earn CEU’s.
  • Please contact your certifying licensing organization or agency directly to inquire if they accept CEU’s from IACET providers or require PDHs, only.
Class Outline Topics: 
  • Discuss how to provide a Continuous Load Path for a Deck and Porch based on the American Wood Council’s DCA6, International Residential Code and International Building Code.

The following topics will be covered: 

  • Fasteners for Outdoor Applications, Deck Ledger Connections, Framing, Guard(rail) Connections, and Corrosion Considerations
To register for this workshop online, obtain more information or find more course listings, visit: www.strongtie.com/workshops

Download the form HERE

Location and Time:

Valley Forge Casino Resort:

1160 First Ave.

King of Prussia, PA 19406

Workshop Hours: Registration & Breakfast: 7:00am – 8:00am

Workshop: 8:00am – 3:30pm

Lunch will be provided

*For questions, please email kmyers@strongtie.com or call her toll free: 800.999.5099 – Extension: 4016