From a NADRA Builder: Stair Rail Safety Concerns

Hello fellow NADRA Members, I recently read an article on one of our manufacture members and wanted to pass

it on. I have been using EZ Stair products for years now, with the large number of decks we build the system works quickly

and adds to the overall quality and long term durability of our decks.  The new stair post mounting option discussed in this ICC-ES eNews article about stair rail safety concerns http://www.ez-stairs.com/imgfiles/pdf/EZ_Stairs_ESR.pdf  is another great use for these brackets.

How many of you have gone out to an existing deck to talk about replacement or re-skinning and found the stair posts to be strong, safe and capable from breaking someone’s fall?  Usually they are calling us because the stairs and rail are no longer safe.  It is amazing how the force on the top of the rail is multiplied by the lever action of the post against the stringer.

Quote from the article:

“The post acted as a lever against the stringer,

magnifying the load on each bolt. A 20-pound pull at the

guardrail level resulted in a 120-pound force at the base of the

post and caused the top bolt to pull through the stringer. Once

the top bolt had broken through, the bottom bolt was left to

resist the entire load. The mechanical advantage was further

amplified by the lower position of the bottom bolt, and the final

50-pound pull on the guard rail became a 1,200-pound force

at the base. This was enough to twist the stringer and cause it

to crack longitudinally”

 

Give it a read, it may change how you think about post mounting.  Is a bolt into a cut stringer going to hold up for long term?

 

Pat Noonan

NADRA Member, Deck and Basement Co.

Minneapolis MN

Research Report Confirms Code Compliance

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                                                                                                                             Research Report for NyloDeck® Confirms Building Code Compliance

Decking material span ratings underscore NyloDeck’s strength and performance traits 

 Covington, GA – November 19, 2012 – Building materials manufacturer NyloBoard, LLC, whose patented process uses recycled carpet fiber and VOC-free resins to create exceptionally strong, durable and eco-friendly products, announced it has received its Code Compliance Research Report (CCRR) 0183 from Architectural Testing, Inc. for NyloDeck®, its newest product.  NyloDeck is a unique composite decking and dock material that contains no wood or PVC. The product was recently introduced this fall at DeckExpo 2012, a national deck and railing industry event.

The CCRR confirms NyloDeck’s compliance with ICC-ES™ Acceptance Criteria, AC-174 and ASTM D 7032.  Receiving the CCRR demonstrates that NyloDeck has met the rigorous requirements set forth by the International Code Council (ICC), who ensures the safety and reliability of building products and provides safeguards for people at home, at school and in the workplace.  The report further documents compliance with the requirements of the 2012 International Building Code (IBC), 2012 International Residential Code (IRC), and the 2010 Florida Building Code (FBC) for deck span ratings.

“Successfully meeting code requirements and third-party testing validates our commitment to producing attractive, versatile NyloDeck boards that are deemed safe and will be reliable for years to come,” said Craig Jacks, vice president, Sales and Marketing at NyloBoard.

NyloDeck is rated for a uniform live load of 100 lbs./psf when installed on support framing spaced at up to 24 inches on center and 200 lbs./psf on framing spaced at up to 16 inches, making it one of the strongest deck products on the market.  The unique patented manufacturing process combining recycled carpet fiber with VOC-free resins has resulted in a product with superior strength and durability whose technology has been proven in the marine industry and other building applications for nearly a decade.

“Most decking materials are limited to framing at 16 inches per 100 pounds, whereas NyloDeck can be used for spans up to 24 inches, which is a testament to our commitment to innovation and superior performance,” said Stuart Dimery, national product manager, NyloBoard. “NyloDeck’s proven material properties – combined with its durability and natural wood appearance – are unmatched in today’s marketplace,” added Dimery.

These span ratings also allow for flexibility in design and reduced material costs as deck boards can be run at a 45° angle with 16 inch spacing, rather than 12 inches, which is the maximum for most competitors.  This is particularly important when considering the replacement of an existing deck.

“At NyloBoard, innovation is inherent in our culture. We continually work to advance our manufacturing technologies so that our products can look great, exceed market expectations and deliver peace of mind for both contractors and homeowners,” noted Jacks.

A full copy of the CCRR 0183 is available on NyloBoard’s Web site at www.Nyloboard.com.  As NyloDeck’s distribution/dealer network is being built, please direct inquiries to the sales team. Call 877-NYLO-909 (877-695-6909) or 770-385-6168 or visit online for more information.

 

NyloDeck’s superior strength and durability allows for greater flexibility in design with deck boards spanning 16” at a 45 degree angle.

About NyloBoard

NyloBoard, LLC is a manufacturer of superior building products whose patented process uses recycled carpet fiber to create exceptionally strong, durable and eco-friendly products, containing no wood or PVC. NyloBoard products help stop the waste stream of carpet fiber that currently contributes billions of pounds of non-reclaimable waste to landfills each year by using it to create products including NyloSheet® and NyloDeck®. Nyloboard also takes pride in manufacturing eco-friendly building products that are impervious to moisture, rot, termites, mold and mildew. NyloBoard‘s manufacturing facility is located in Covington, Georgia, just outside of Atlanta.

 

 

 

Update: ICC Action Committee Proposal

The ICC Building Code Action Committee is considering a very large proposal for deck construction provisions to be included in the 2015 IRC.  Anyone is invited to provide feedback, both opponent and proponent, on the proposal.  The committee wishes to work on the document with the industry, prior to the hearings next year.  Take a look at this proposal and see if you want these provisions to become code? Code, such that any other option is an “alternative” that has to be convinced to the building official over “just doing what the code says”.

You decide, NADRA.  What are your opinions about this?

There are some helpful provisions…and some…others.  It’s a long document…but it’s very, very serious. Code that comes out of an ICC Action Committee comes with some serious power.  Get involved and help NADRA represent our industry in the code development process.  We need you.

NADRA is positioned as the voice of the deck, dock and railing industry. Send your input toInfo@NADRA.org.

Read Proposal

 

 

NADRA October 2012 National Code Meeting

We were quite pleased by the turnout of professionals that attended the meeting at Deck Expo about the development of the 2015 IRC.  Members from all aspects of our industry sat together while we delivered a message about the upcoming code modification process, the goals, needs and the current status of NADRA in regard to this process.  This was followed by an open format for member to discuss their concerns and ideas and to ask questions.  This meet and greet was a great start to getting the association working together on important code issues that affect us all.

A few points of discussion:

1)   It was brought up by a member that the lateral load anchor detail in the IRC should be a priority of NADRA in the upcoming process.  This code provision has garnered the attention of the entire industry since it’s inclusion in the code.  Builders and code administrators alike are baffled with how to handle this detail in the application of the code.  However, it is not easily removed from the code, as was discovered in the process for the 2012 IRC, where it was proven that logical issues would alone not remove it.  The testing performed by Washington State regarding lateral live loads from deck occupants was discussed as a possible reference for deriving actual lateral loads that need resistance, as opposed to an arbitrary number, now provided in the IRC.  It was strongly agreed that this portion of the IRC needs modification, but equally recognized that research and testing will likely be necessary for the ICC membership to consider any modification proposal.

2)   The need for funding for the work of NADRA in the code change process was discussed, as well as ideas for fundraising.  Builders present were brainstorming ideas for a grass-roots type of support and fundraising that allows builder members to directly support and promote the NADRA code change efforts.  It was recognized that the financial burden couldn’t be put solely on the shoulders of our industry members.  At the same time, industry members still showed their support in the effort.  When industry pros like FastenMaster and Fiberon stand with builders for a common effort in code, you know you’ve got an industry working together.  The Professional Deck Builder, a trade journal, was also there, and offered to help publicize our efforts.

3)   The strategy for growing NADRA’s presence in the ICC modification process was discussed.  It was proposed that NADRA select some low-hanging fruit code modifications that will be an easy win.  This will allow NADRA and NADRA’s representative, Glenn Mathewson, to make a good and positive first impression on the ICC membership and committee during the 2013 process.  The primary efforts will be focused on reviewing, commenting and proposing modification to proposals submitted by others.  The ICC process provides many opportunities to building and modify the code throughout the process, including modification of others proposals.

If you are a NADRA member, or an industry professional, we invite you to join us in the discussion of the future of ICC code provisions that affect deck construction.  Send an email to NADRA Headquarters, at info@nadra.org, or to Glenn Mathewson, at glennmathewson@nadra.org

Send Us Your Local Codes

July 10, 2012 | Quality products take time and effort to produce.  They take research, preparations and planning.  One such quality product on the horizon for NADRA is a “NADRA Deck Construction Standard”, or some sort of similar title.  With so much information available online for deck construction, it’s hard to know what sources are legitimate and reputable.  There’s quite a mix of opinions online and in practice.  As the nation’s only association for professionals in the deck and railing industry, maybe we should work to produce a new standard…a NADRA standard.  Together, our membership spans the entire industry and can provide the best foundation for our country to build the next generation of decks on.  It’s going to take knowledge from all parts of the industry to truly represent the industry.  We have that knowledge.

To develop a NADRA standard we need to compare our practices to the various local deck construction requirements across our nation and be sure we’re ahead.  The International Residential Code is often amended locally before adoption.  Double this with the difficulty of relating many IRC provisions to deck construction, and you’ve got little “standard” to work from.  To soften this issue, many local building departments have developed their own guides for deck construction.  We need to review them.  Being in the “research” stage of this lofty goal, your association needs your help.  Send us a link or pdf to any and all local deck construction guides you can find.  We need to have the opportunity to see what other ideas there are in our nation about deck construction minimum standards long before we create our own.

We need to do our homework.

Members…send us your local standards and guides so we can start to prepare. Email Info@NADRA.org

Glenn Mathewson

Technical Advisor

Contracts and Building Permits

 by: John Paulin of Tailor Decks, Inc.

June 18, 2012 | I have been building decks in Atlanta for more than 20 years and have seen so many changes over the years.  I can’t imagine starting my business today in this industry with all the changes and demands.  It use to be so simple.  No one was getting building permits, or even thought about it. Heck, I even remember selling projects and never having contracts. Could you imagine doing that today?!

Building permits and contracts are the most important part to any successful businesses nowadays. Pulling building permits and working with inspectors can be a pain at first, but once you push through it, it becomes habit and not so bad.  I use to think contracts were insulting, and that two people should be able to work together with a hand shake.  Well, that part may be true, but that is not what a contract is about.

A contract outlines the scope of work to be performed by the contractor and what the contractor expects from the purchaser.  When I meet with the purchaser, there are so many different items discussed and so many different options, who could ever keep up with all of them?  The more descriptive the contract is, the smoother the project runs.  When a disagreement arises between the contractor and purchaser, the contract is there to fall back on.

My contract today is 8 pages long and is very descriptive. It outlines the scope of work, the payment schedule, the warranty, and discusses all unexpected items that may come up and cost involved. I have been working on my companies contract for over two years now and still adding an item here and there when something new comes up.  I don’t know if it will ever be finished.  For the first 17 years of Tailor Decks, my contract was only 1 page with an attachment which briefly described the work to be performed.

I was recently talking with some contractors that have been in the construction industry longer than I have, and they all felt the longer the contract is, the purchaser perceives the builder to be more professional.  I think this has a lot of truth to it and I may be on the right path.

What do you think? Feel free to send comments or start discussions. I would love to hear from some fellow NADRA members.

ICC’s Backyard Safety

May 15, 2012 | There’s a lot of information out there on the web about backyard safety, from those aimed at providing “parenting advice” to medical websites aimed at keeping bandages on the shelf.  Another such source is the International Code Council (ICC), the publisher of our nations leading model construction codes. In the big scheme of things, decks are a small part of our built environment.  With ICC providing codes and standards for large commercial complexes, like hotels and retail centers, it’s nice when our industry of backyard decks gets some attention…and not just in new code provisions.  For Building Safety Month, May of every year, ICC is focusing attention on decks and outdoor living…a good sign that our industry is vibrant, growing and important to our culture.

The article behind this link provides a nice call to owners and property managers that decks don’t last forever, or may have been built substandard to begin with.  Too many of our fellow Americans don’t realize the need to regularly maintain and inspect their decks…and that means more than a swipe of a staining rag.  They often dismiss the very real hazards that backyard decks, grills and pools inadvertently create for us.  Public services messages like this, from non-profit organizations, are there for our benefit and our neighbor’s benefit.  Take a read, get ideas, get inspired and share this message.  Just forward the link.

http://www.iccsafe.org/safety/Pages/Backyard.aspx

 

What’s Your Story?

April 24, 2012 | No happy thoughts for me this week about harmony in the codes for all.  I want the worst of it, your worst story about codes, inspectors, permits and the like.  Come on, take me down; knock me out.  You know I used to be an inspector…now I just review your plans and decide how long it takes you to get a permit, he, he, he.*  Give me your rant!

*[Cynical, diabolical laugh]

All kidding aside, I want to hear about how things are going for you with codes and their enforcement in your area, and not just the bad stuff.  I’d like to hear your good experiences too and if you’re working well with your building department.  Give me your pulse of how the building code industry is affecting your business.  Help me understand where it is I can help NADRA…and help you.

“I had an inspector require me to pull a nail out of a hanger to verify if it was the correct nail.  Nope…it was a short hanger nail used in a double joist hanger.  The manufacturer called for 3-inch nails.  The inspector was correct, but in the big scheme of things, the load limits for the hanger’s correct installation was ten fold what I used it for.  It was a double joist used as a nailer for a change in decking direction.  It wasn’t going anywhere as it stood, but alas, it had the wrong nails, and it cost me the inspection that day.  Always kept the hardware catalog and instructions with me after that.”

-Glenn

What does it mean to me to be an advisor to NADRA?

April 23, 2012 | It means I am here to help.  I am here to share insight into a different industry, the building code industry.  The code industry is going through some growing pains.  The electric code, energy and green codes, and fire sprinkler mandate, for example, have created some worry amongst professionals.  The IRC for residential keeps growing larger, while the IBC for commercial is referring more to other costly standards…

But I’m already boring you…  Decks are your business, not codes.

I would agree it’s not your worry, if we were back in 2006, or if you’re working under the 06 IRC.  That was before decks and codes really collided.  The code industry is way ahead of you though and decks are plenty included.  In nine month…NINE MONTHS…the deadlines for the 2015 IRC are due…alas…here I go again on a code rant…

It means I am here to stay ahead of the codes for you, or at least in front.  It means I can be your representative in the code industry.  I can listen to your current experiences and concerns about the industry.  It also means I can help connect the membership in an informed and sensible compromise of ideals such that the industry can flourish together…ahhh…

To do this we need to connect.  Find me on LinkedIn or Twitter, find my messages in the weekly newsletter, visit the blog page, or send me an email.  Help me work on your behalf and not my guess of it.  I can’t advise or represent the association in the code industry if I’m not connected to the membership.

Hey! I only said “code” eleven times.  Not bad.

-Glenn

 

Lateral Load Language Lesson: 2012 IRC

April 23, 2012 | A subtle change in the 2012 IRC makes the application of the lateral load anchor connection figure more understandable.  Under the 2009 IRC, Section R502.2.2.3 confused some readers by its statement that the lateral load figure, “shall be permitted”, only to later state that “devices shall be installed in not less than two locations”.  The first statement is clear that the connection is merely allowed by code, but not permitted.  However the latter seems to require the use of two or more.

In the 2012 IRC the original intent of the language was clarified, with clear direction. It is only when the connection detail is voluntarily chosen that there must be at least two devices installed.  It is merely a design option.

Overall, this is a good win for the industry.  Success is had when the language of the code can be made clearer.  The more consistently the code is interpreted, the more of a “standard” it can be.

-Glenn