NADRA Code Update by Glenn Mathewson

Code Update , By Glenn Mathewson
“NADRA has submitted public comments for the Public Comment Hearing (formally the Final Action Hearing). Links to public comments are posted below. As always, NADRA welcomes feedback from our members.”

RB6 Public Comment

RB262 Public Comment

RB264 Public Comment

RB265 Public Comment

RB465 Public Comment

RB26-13 Public Comment

*** ICC Group B Public Comment Hearings take place  Oct. 2-10 , Atlantic City Convention Center — Atlantic City, N.J. Register HERE

Please check back to NADRA’s Code Page on www.NADRA.org for all updates on Code and how NADRA is participating. Click HERE to view.

Vision: Safe decks with well-thought-out engineering and a common sense practical approach to code requirements.

Code Mission Statement: To advance and protect industry interests in the code development arena and to promote member involvement; to promote governmental and agency reliance on NADRA as a voice for the industry; to create and maintain relationships with key government agencies and code officials; to be a forum for the discussion, study, and investigation of proposed and existing model code development, federal and state legislation and programs, and to report such findings to the Board of Directors and the Membership.

This section of NADRA’s website is dedicated to building code requirements and best building practices related to outdoor living structures.

Here you will find references to help you interpret code topics, links to jurisdiction websites for licensing and code requirements, and much more.

NADRA is always looking to add to the information provided in this section of the website, so please feel free to suggest a link by clicking here.

Code Question from a NADRA Builder

The below inquiry came in from a NADRA Maryland Deck Builder. With permission from Dave, we opted to post this publicly so we could accept replies from fellow members and industry leaders. Please reply in the comments section. There will be an approval process, so give us a day or two to post your comments. Thank you!
  1. What does code require in regards to wood rail post attachment……outside of RB61-13
  2. Why are some jurisdictions mandating the Simpson or USP bracket…..???
  3. What is testing results of 2 thru bolts and blocking??
  4. Can the  “FRANK”  VT  testing be published or accessible for use by all jurisdictions or is it only for sale to those who benefit????  Seems to be yet another PRIME example of how code is more a for profit industry and not for the public good
  5. Why are we being forced to spend on average $200.+ on hardware and 3 hours of time + to install this crap when EVERYONE BUT code officials and testers know that 2 bolts and proper blocking would meet the  code requirements of RB61-13  ????
Thanks,
David Lombardo

NADRA MN Chapter Engaged Experts Event

May 9th, 2013 was a memorable day for the MN NADRA Chapter. Representatives from every sector of the Minnesota Deck and Rail industry were on hand to support NADRA’s effort to further develop its industry leading CPAC program (Consumer Protection Awareness Charter).

Engaging speakers gave viable, educational information that sparked many valuable conversations for attendees. Presentations were then followed up by tours of Element’s St. Paul facilities, including live testing demonstrations.

Third-Party testing experts were on hand to share their knowledge in the areas of corrosion, environmental, flexural, mechanical and live load testing. Code officials from several local jurisdictions and a representative from the ICC-ES were present to answer questions concerning codes or product evaluation.  Product manufactures, lumberyards, distributors and local deck builders were all present to discuss industry issues and learn more of the NADRA CPAC program.

The common message thread; Quality and Approved Tested Products are a must! Whether it is ICC-ES, CCRR or ASTM tested products; all were in agreement, that the world of product testing is convoluted and there is a need for industry standardization.

Please contact NADRA EVP, Michael Beaudry to join the NADRA CPAC effort by emailing Info@NADRA.org

A special thank you to the following MN NADRA contributors:

  • Host:  Element Materials Technology
  • Sponsors: Screw Products, Inc., Williams Architectural Products, Gossen Corp., and Homeland Vinyl Products, Inc.
  • Speakers: Barry Johnson-ICC-ES, Stan Hathorn-Homeland Vinyl, Roger Axel-New Hope Code Official and Tom Kolden-Element Materials Technology

 

 

Recap of 2013 Group B Committee Action Hearing

Recap of 2013 Group B Committee Action Hearing (Dallas, TX) 

Last week the IRC code hearings were held in Dallas, TX. NADRA’s Technical Advisor, Glenn Mathewson represented the association on numerous proposals. This work is just beginning & your support is NEEDED on key issues that WILL effect your businesses and will effect this industry.  Your support is encouraged so these efforts can continue on behalf of the membership and industry the association serves. NADRA Headquarters and the entire board would like to personally thank Glenn Mathewson for his time and efforts at these hearings.

Recap of 2013 Group B Committee Action Hearing (Dallas) – By NADRA Technical Advisor, Glenn Mathewson:

Take Action: Now that the ICC Committee Action Hearings are over, be sure to follow the link about the public comment hearings. The first recap of an approved proposal is a good example of WHY we need your support so we can continue to be heard at these hearings! 

Here is a recap of proposed changes due to NADRA’s efforts at the hearings: 

On Monday,  April 22nd, the proposals to the pool and spa code were heard.  SP47-13 was disapproved.  Here was the proposal: “Walking surfaces of decks within 4 feet of a pool or spa that are not equivalent in the strength, durability and slip resistance of the surface of a concrete deck shall be prohibited.  Wooden walking surfaces and carpeted walking surfaces shall not be placed within 4 feet of a pool.”
RB143-13, proposing to return to measuring the height of a deck at the very edge of the deck (for determining if guards are required) was defeated with the help of NADRA.  Our professionals stood by the actual hazard and the current code that requires that height to be measured at a point three feet horizontally from the deck edge.  We know where our customers will hit the ground if they fall, and it is not directly at the edge of the deck.  With integrity for our industry and an understanding of the actual determination of hazard, we stood, we spoke and we were heard.”

RB145-13 proposing to eliminate the requirement to measure guard height from a fixed bench seat was approved.  This requirement in the 2009 and 2012 IRC effectively put an end to bench seating.  While some with small children may prefer not to have a bench against guards, the majority of our membership believe that is an individual choice, not a minimum standard.  The architectural liberties of our customers are one step closer to returning to them.  Other professional associations had helpful testimony to this goal, but our intimate perspective of how this affected our industry came only from us.  This approval supports a balance between minimum design and safety, the latter of which can always be improved by the personal choice of the homeowner or builder.”


RB75-13 proposed that all decks, detached or attached, ground level or upper level, regardless of materials, would be prohibited from being less than five feet from property lines to prohibit fire spread.  NADRA stood and shared the reality that many noncombustible decking and framing materials are available.  We explained that low level decks have different dynamics of fire spread than upper level decks.  We described how this proposal would unnecessarily put the decking market at an unfair disadvantage to patio pavers and flagstone for ground level decks.  The committee heard our sole voice on these concerns and unanimously disapproved the proposal.  NADRA made it clear that work is needed to figure out how decks contribute to fire spread and how to regulate it in the code, but not to do it without us in the conversation.  We plan to work with these proponents during the public comment period so we can get this issue figured out the right way.”


RB74-13 proposed some serious consequences to the decking industry regarding placement of stairs.  While well intentioned for other purposes, it was dangerously flawed.  Imagine a deck connecting between a house and a detached garage.  This proposal would have prohibited any stairs within five feet of the garage.  Huh?  No wide steps from house to garage on one side of the deck, even for a few steps to the backyard.  NADRA stood against this proposal and the committee unanimously agreed and disapproved the proposal.”


“NADRA’S proposal, RB58-13, for replacing all use of the term “guardrails” for the IRC defined term “guard” has been approved as submitted unanimously by the committee.  This simple change secures architectural freedom for guards, and that they don’t have to have a “rail”.  On with the custom work of kitchens counters, planters, benches or whatever other feature that can be built to the requirements of a guard.”


 “RB6-13 was approved.  The size limit of 200sf for requiring a permit on low level decks was approved.  This will allow more under bid decks to be built poorly, putting our professionals (who build right regardless of permits) at an unfair disadvantage.  I encourage our members to support a public comment to disapprove this at final action.”

NADRA – How to Promote Deck Safety Month®

May is Deck Safety Month ®

In 2006 NADRA, The North American Deck and Railing Association declared May as Deck Safety Month®. NADRA’s Deck safety program is an effort to improve deck safety awareness!

Here are some helpful ways to promote Deck Safety during the month of May! Please call NADRA direct with any questions you may have: 215.679.4884 or email: Info@NADRA.org. We are here to help!

Tips to Promote Deck Safety Awareness: Download the PDF now to learn ways to spread the word! Click HERE.

Visit NADRA’s Deck Safety Webpage for links to the Deck Safety Month® Video, Deck Evaluation Form & The Consumer Checklist

*** Exclusive Offer to NADRA Members: 

The association is now producing professional quality, custom videos for NADRA members. The video itself can be customized with your logo, contact information and photos.

Help spread the word about Deck Safety Awareness!

 

Pictures and text are no longer enough to stand out. That’s why video can have dramatic effect on point-of-sale conversation rates for products, services as well as provide significant boost in search engine rankings. Get noticed on listing sites and FaceBook!

 

  • High definition file! Good for online, HD TV, or a projector!
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Get started today by calling: 1.888.623.7248 or Email: Info@NADRA.org

Custom Videos Start at Just $99

A very Special Thank you to Fiberon for Sponsoring Deck Safety Month 2013!

2015 Code Update, By Glenn Mathewson

Two weeks ago the code proposals for the creation of the 2015 IRC were posted for public review, and NADRA quickly made our industry aware.  There are a lot of them to review.  In building codes alone there were 1132 pages of proposals.

 

I have read and skimmed through all these pages and found the proposals related in some way to our industry.  These proposal numbers and a brief explanation can be read HERE

 

There’s some good stuff, some questionable stuff and some…other stuff proposed.  I will be at the hearings in Dallas at the end of April representing NADRA and our industry…so let NADRA know what you think.  Here are some highlights of what may be ready and waiting for you in the future.  I know 2015 is years away…but the decisions are being made now.

 

RB61 suggests adding various deflection limitations for guards.  This is a tough one.  Manufactured guard assemblies are already tested to these limits, so it’s generally business-as-usual.  It’s the custom built guards that take the hit.  How will the inspector verify these limits?  How will you know your standard cedar guardrail meets these limits?  Speaking of deflection, RB61 proposes to nail down a deflection limit of L/360 for decks.  Is that too much for a deck with no ceiling below?  Take a look and see what you think of the proposed deflection limits, but give a long read to RB268 as well.  Among many other requirements, take a look at how it could affect your guard design and construction.  Do these ideas work for you, or could they be refined?

 

The lateral load tension device provision that is neither required nor validated will get more involved if RB260, RB261, RB262 and RB263 are approved.  Should this flawed code provision get further complicated and accepted through new exceptions to what is not even a rule…  Should more lateral load methods, based on loads that are yet to be understood, be printed in the ever-growing IRC?  Research on lateral live loads has occurred and more sound and validated standards will be produced in the future.  Will it be a greater uphill struggle to this goal if this section is made more complicated now?

 

“Fire separation distance” is the IRC’s version of “setbacks”.  Decks have long been ignored in the IRC in regard to how close to property lines they can be built.  RB74 and RB75 would end this, and decks and stairs would simply be prohibited from being any closer than 5 feet from the lot line.  Should there be an exception for decks under a certain height?  RB66 also proposes new fire separation ideas for decks, but they’re less restrictive.  Should we interject our experiences and opinions on this topic?

 

The 2009 and 2012 IRC effectively killed built-in seating at guards with the requirement to measure the minimum 36-inch guard height from the seat.  RB145 proposes to eliminate that requirement and bring back some architectural freedom to guard design.  How does that one sound to you?  Should it get NADRA support?  What about eliminating blocking over cantilevers 2 feet or less, as described in RB247.  That might help in installing some deck drainage systems.

 

Well, there’s a start to understanding what’s on the table for the IRC, and I hope it’s caught your interest.  There are more than just those.  Proposals can be modified during the whole process, so proposals that may have flaws, can be built upon and corrected.  As the voice of the decking industry, we have a chance to help build on these proposals and take a hold of the future of our industry.

 

Please send your feedback to Info@NADRA.org

Stay Ahead of The Change; 2015 Codes Underway Now

The time has come again for us to be a part of our future…for you to be a part of your future.  The International Code Council released the proposed changes to the 2012 International Residential Code (IRC) on March 11th.  The ideas contained in these proposals come from professionals and non-professionals from all corners of the construction industry and from all over the nation and result in the 2015 IRC.  Now is the time for the decking industry to review these ideas and see how they affect our industry, both positive and negative.

 

In only a handful of weeks, I will be in Dallas at the ICC Committee action hearings representing NADRA to speak in opposition or support for any proposals that affect our industry.  The hearings run from April 20th to 31st, where over 2,000 individual proposed changes will be discussed.

 

The decisions made from now until this Fall will be those that determine what code will be published in 2015 and what you will be working under in 2016 and beyond.  NADRA needs your help reviewing these proposals to determine which ones matter to us and our opinion of them.  Please follow the link found HERE to ICC’s website and choose a PDF to download and begin reviewing.  Please keep us informed of your efforts and opinions in the next few weeks, as official NADRA positions on proposals need to be determined well before the hearings.  We need your opinions to know our position.  Now is the time, and there’s not much of it.

 

On behalf of the NADRA leadership and membership and most certainly on behalf of myself, I look forward to working together to create our future.

 

Thank you,

 

Glenn Mathewson

NADRA Technical Advisor

Code Proposal – Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down?

The Fairfax Group is a group that attended a meeting a few weeks ago in Fairfax, VA to work together on deck code proposal that originated in Fairfax. Those in attendance were the AWC, NAHB, CLMA, NADRA, VBCOA, CCICC, Simpson Strong Tie and others. The group also had a conference call-in from Dr. Don Bender. The group is looking for support from organizations and associations throughout the industry for the proposed code suggestions found HERE.
This started as an eleven page document. With NADRA’s involvement in this committee, and the efforts of Glenn Mathewson, NADRA’s Technical Advisor, the proposed changes now consist of the 3 pages – again, found HERE.
Please provide your “Thumbs Up” or “Thumbs Down” by Wednesday, 12/19/12 at 2pm EST.
The original 11 pages can be found here on the NADRA Blog, just scroll down.NADRA has until tomorrow to decide if we want to endorse this proposal with our name on it.  If not, we can always continue to work on it during the hearings next year as modification can occur throughout the process.  A thumbs down that comes with a reason “why” is helpful, as we can address the “why” during the hearings. Please post your feedback in this feed.

Thank you,

NADRA HQ & Glenn Mathewson, Technical Advisor

From a NADRA Builder: Stair Rail Safety Concerns

Hello fellow NADRA Members, I recently read an article on one of our manufacture members and wanted to pass

it on. I have been using EZ Stair products for years now, with the large number of decks we build the system works quickly

and adds to the overall quality and long term durability of our decks.  The new stair post mounting option discussed in this ICC-ES eNews article about stair rail safety concerns http://www.ez-stairs.com/imgfiles/pdf/EZ_Stairs_ESR.pdf  is another great use for these brackets.

How many of you have gone out to an existing deck to talk about replacement or re-skinning and found the stair posts to be strong, safe and capable from breaking someone’s fall?  Usually they are calling us because the stairs and rail are no longer safe.  It is amazing how the force on the top of the rail is multiplied by the lever action of the post against the stringer.

Quote from the article:

“The post acted as a lever against the stringer,

magnifying the load on each bolt. A 20-pound pull at the

guardrail level resulted in a 120-pound force at the base of the

post and caused the top bolt to pull through the stringer. Once

the top bolt had broken through, the bottom bolt was left to

resist the entire load. The mechanical advantage was further

amplified by the lower position of the bottom bolt, and the final

50-pound pull on the guard rail became a 1,200-pound force

at the base. This was enough to twist the stringer and cause it

to crack longitudinally”

 

Give it a read, it may change how you think about post mounting.  Is a bolt into a cut stringer going to hold up for long term?

 

Pat Noonan

NADRA Member, Deck and Basement Co.

Minneapolis MN

Research Report Confirms Code Compliance

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                                                                                                                             Research Report for NyloDeck® Confirms Building Code Compliance

Decking material span ratings underscore NyloDeck’s strength and performance traits 

 Covington, GA – November 19, 2012 – Building materials manufacturer NyloBoard, LLC, whose patented process uses recycled carpet fiber and VOC-free resins to create exceptionally strong, durable and eco-friendly products, announced it has received its Code Compliance Research Report (CCRR) 0183 from Architectural Testing, Inc. for NyloDeck®, its newest product.  NyloDeck is a unique composite decking and dock material that contains no wood or PVC. The product was recently introduced this fall at DeckExpo 2012, a national deck and railing industry event.

The CCRR confirms NyloDeck’s compliance with ICC-ES™ Acceptance Criteria, AC-174 and ASTM D 7032.  Receiving the CCRR demonstrates that NyloDeck has met the rigorous requirements set forth by the International Code Council (ICC), who ensures the safety and reliability of building products and provides safeguards for people at home, at school and in the workplace.  The report further documents compliance with the requirements of the 2012 International Building Code (IBC), 2012 International Residential Code (IRC), and the 2010 Florida Building Code (FBC) for deck span ratings.

“Successfully meeting code requirements and third-party testing validates our commitment to producing attractive, versatile NyloDeck boards that are deemed safe and will be reliable for years to come,” said Craig Jacks, vice president, Sales and Marketing at NyloBoard.

NyloDeck is rated for a uniform live load of 100 lbs./psf when installed on support framing spaced at up to 24 inches on center and 200 lbs./psf on framing spaced at up to 16 inches, making it one of the strongest deck products on the market.  The unique patented manufacturing process combining recycled carpet fiber with VOC-free resins has resulted in a product with superior strength and durability whose technology has been proven in the marine industry and other building applications for nearly a decade.

“Most decking materials are limited to framing at 16 inches per 100 pounds, whereas NyloDeck can be used for spans up to 24 inches, which is a testament to our commitment to innovation and superior performance,” said Stuart Dimery, national product manager, NyloBoard. “NyloDeck’s proven material properties – combined with its durability and natural wood appearance – are unmatched in today’s marketplace,” added Dimery.

These span ratings also allow for flexibility in design and reduced material costs as deck boards can be run at a 45° angle with 16 inch spacing, rather than 12 inches, which is the maximum for most competitors.  This is particularly important when considering the replacement of an existing deck.

“At NyloBoard, innovation is inherent in our culture. We continually work to advance our manufacturing technologies so that our products can look great, exceed market expectations and deliver peace of mind for both contractors and homeowners,” noted Jacks.

A full copy of the CCRR 0183 is available on NyloBoard’s Web site at www.Nyloboard.com.  As NyloDeck’s distribution/dealer network is being built, please direct inquiries to the sales team. Call 877-NYLO-909 (877-695-6909) or 770-385-6168 or visit online for more information.

 

NyloDeck’s superior strength and durability allows for greater flexibility in design with deck boards spanning 16” at a 45 degree angle.

About NyloBoard

NyloBoard, LLC is a manufacturer of superior building products whose patented process uses recycled carpet fiber to create exceptionally strong, durable and eco-friendly products, containing no wood or PVC. NyloBoard products help stop the waste stream of carpet fiber that currently contributes billions of pounds of non-reclaimable waste to landfills each year by using it to create products including NyloSheet® and NyloDeck®. Nyloboard also takes pride in manufacturing eco-friendly building products that are impervious to moisture, rot, termites, mold and mildew. NyloBoard‘s manufacturing facility is located in Covington, Georgia, just outside of Atlanta.