Quality is a top priority. Build above the minimum standard.

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When choosing materials for deck construction, it is imperative to understand the difference between Above Ground pressure treated wood versus Ground Contact pressure treated wood. The American Wood Protection Association updated their standards in 2016 to state that some physically above the ground locations require Ground Contact treatment.

One of the requirements states: “Materials used above ground but are difficult to maintain, repair or replace and are critical to the performance and safety of the entire system” should be treated to ground contact retentions. Deck joists and beams ARE difficult to repair or replace and are absolutely critical to the safety of the structure. For this reason, joists and beams should always be treated to Ground Contact retention, regardless of warranties offered that state otherwise. In order to be building code compliant, AWPA standards must be followed, regardless of the material warranty offered.

Quality is a top priority to you. Build above the minimum standard. Learn more here

Koppers Celebrates Ten Years of Commercial Production

Koppers Performance Chemicals’ MicroPro, Micronized Copper wood preservative technology, celebrates ten years of commercial production.

Today, treated wood products using the micronized copper preservative system represent the majority of treated wood sold into residential and agricultural markets in the U.S.  The Koppers’ MicroPro technology is a patented system and is also sold in Canada, Europe, Scandinavia, New Zealand, Australia, Asia and in Central and South America. The Koppers’ micronized copper preservative system is an American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) standardized wood preservative. In addition, MicroPro treated wood products, as described in the International Code Council (ICC Evaluation Services Inc. ESR-2240), meet all major model building code requirements. Wood products treated with the MicroPro wood preservative can be used in above ground (UC3B), ground contact (UC4A) and critical ground contact (UC4B) end use applications.

The Koppers’ micronizing technology is also used to produce color pigment stains, mold inhibitors and other additives that benefit treated wood. The MicroPro treated wood process is the only wood preservative system with all these third party environmental and green certifications such as the Scientific Certification Systems’ Environmentally Preferable Product (EPP) Certification, Underwriters Laboratories GREENGUARD GOLD Certification,and the Home Innovation NGBS Green Certification. Since its commercial introduction in 2007, over 20 Billion board feet have been treated with the micronized copper preservative.

Tom G Horvat

U.S. Marketing Manager

Koppers Performance Chemicals | 1016 Everee Inn Road | Griffin, GA 30224 | United States

T: +1 770 233 4222 | F: +1 770 229 5225

Choosing the correct wood for your outdoor project

Choosing the correct wood for your outdoor project, by: Lonza Wood Protection

This past year the wood preserving industry took a bold stance on quality when the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) voted to require higher amounts of preservative for wood used in many applications. The AWPA, an organization comprised of individuals from all facets of the wood protection industry that sets standards for wood preservation and treated wood, updated its standards to require wood treated to Ground Contact retentions be used in many physically above-ground applications, including when:

  • soil or other debris may build up and stay in contact with the wood
  • insufficient ventilation does not allow air circulation around wood
  • material is installed <6 inches above the ground on permeable building materials
  • material is installed in contact with non-durable untreated or older construction with evidence of decay
  • wood is subject to frequent or recurring wetting
  • located in tropical climates
  • the wood is both:

— difficult to maintain, repair or replace and

— critical to the performance and safety of the entire system

Building codes require that preserved wood comply with these standards and the installer must decide if these conditions are present, select, and install the correct material for the project.  The wood preserving industry and many retailers have helped implement these standards by switching inventories of lumber in sizes commonly used for structural parts of decks to Ground Contact retentions. Some retailers have switched all lumber, including decking and railing, to Ground Contact retentions. These changes benefit builders and consumers by removing the guesswork from the decision process. Buyers can focus on their project rather than deciding if they need to purchase Ground Contact wood.

“It is important,” says, Jay Hilsenbeck, chemist and residential product specialist from Lonza Wood Protection, “to educate builders, contractors, and DIYers so they know what wood to choose for their project. During Deck Safety Month® we focus on deck inspections, but we should also focus on quality and proper construction practices before construction begins. The builder should consider the deck surroundings. For a deck built close to the ground, for example, Ground Contact retentions would be required under the new AWPA guidelines.”

The contractor should also consider what parts of the deck (joists, beams, ledger boards, posts) are important to sustain the structure and are more expensive or time-consuming to repair after the project is complete. The contractor and homeowner should work together to discuss the environmental conditions such as if the deck will be subject to constant wetting from a pool or sprinklers or if there will be debris build-up.

With that knowledge, contractors and homeowners can have peace-of-mind that they have chosen the appropriate preserved wood for the project. Contractors can offer their clients the confidence that they are providing a durable outdoor living space for their homeowner clients to enjoy for many years.

Each May, during Deck Safety Month®, homeowners can focus on evaluating the items in the deck safety checklist, knowing their deck was built using the right preserved wood.

Learn more

 

84 Lumber® Introduces Ecolife®

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 17, 2017
Charlotte, North Carolina

Contact:   Christopher Kollwitz
800-421-8661      
productinfo@viance.net
 
 

84 Lumber® Introduces Ecolife® for Above Ground Treated Wood

84 Lumber® Co., one of the nation’s leading lumber dealers, is now selling Ecolife® Stabilized Weather-Resistant Wood for above ground applications in decks, fencing and similar projects.  Ecolife® integrates a wood preservative with a built-in stabilizer that keep boards straighter and resists twisting, warping, cracking and checking.

Ecolife® is fully compliant with American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) standards and International Building Code (IBC®) and International Residential Code (IRC®) codes for most deck projects.  Viance, the producer of Ecolife®, offers a Lifetime Limited Warranty on above ground preservative treatment, which includes wood framing members that are critical to the safety and performance of the structure, including joists and beams.

For common deck applications, Ecolife® is a more cost-effective option when compared to products treated for ground contact use, and is still the best option for outdoor projects when used appropriately.

Deck builders, code enforcement officials and homeowners can learn more about Ecolife® and Code Compliant above ground treated wood at www.treatedwood.com/options. Contact your local 84 Lumber® store for Ecolife® availability.

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About 84 Lumber®:

Founded in 1956, 84 Lumber® Company is the nation’s leading privately held supplier of building materials, manufactured components, and industry-leading services for single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. 84 Lumber® operates more than 250 stores, component manufacturing plants, custom door shops, custom millwork shops, and engineered wood product (EWP) centers in 30 states, representing the top 130 markets in the country. 84 Lumber® also offers professional residential and commercial contractors turn-key installed services for a variety of products including framing, insulation, siding, windows, roofing, decking, and drywall. A certified women’s business enterprise owned by Maggie Hardy Magerko, 84 Lumber® was named as one of Forbes’ Best Midsize Employers in America 2016 and Forbes’ Largest Private Companies in America 2016. For more information, please visit www.84lumber.com.

About Viance, LLC:

Providing an extensive range of advanced wood treatment technologies and services to the global wood treatment industry, with an expertise in wood biocides and wood protection chemicals, Viance LLC is an industry leader in the development of advanced building material solutions that improve the performance and durability of wood and wood products for sustainable building. Viance is a joint venture between the Huntsman Corporation and the Dow Chemical Company.

Preserving and enhancing the performance of wood products creates one of the world’s most sustainable building products by extending the Life-Cycle of the worlds timber resources, reducing energy requirements, landfill waste, and fewer greenhouse gas emissions than its non-renewable counterparts. For more information about Viance treated wood solutions, visit www.Treatedwood.com or call 1-800-421-8661. Viance, LLC, 8001 IBM Drive, Charlotte, NC 28262

About Dow:
Dow (NYSE: DOW) combines the power of science and technology to passionately innovate what is essential to human progress. The Company is driving innovations that extract value from material, polymer, chemical and biological science to help address many of the world’s most challenging problems, such as the need for fresh food, safer and more sustainable transportation, clean water, energy efficiency, more durable infrastructure, and increasing agricultural productivity. Dow’s integrated, market-driven portfolio delivers a broad range of technology-based products and solutions to customers in 175 countries and in high-growth sectors such as packaging, infrastructure, transportation, consumer care, electronics, and agriculture. In 2016, Dow had annual sales of $48 billion and employed approximately 56,000 people worldwide. The Company’s more than 7,000 product families are manufactured at 189 sites in 34 countries across the globe. References to “Dow” or the “Company” mean The Dow Chemical Company and its consolidated subsidiaries unless otherwise expressly noted. More information about Dow can be found at
www.dow.com.

About Huntsman:
Huntsman Corporation is a publicly traded global manufacturer and marketer of differentiated chemicals with 2016 revenues of approximately $10 billion.  Our chemical products number in the thousands and are sold worldwide to manufacturers serving a broad and diverse range of consumer and industrial end markets. We operate more than 100 manufacturing and R&D facilities in approximately 30 countries and employ approximately 15,000 associates within our 5 distinct business divisions including the Pigments and Additives division that we intend to spin-off as Venator Materials Corporation. For more information about Huntsman, please visit the company’s website at
 www.huntsman.com.

Forward-Looking Statements:
Statements in this release that are not historical are forward-looking statements. These statements are based on management’s current beliefs and expectations. The forward-looking statements in this release are subject to uncertainty and changes in circumstances and involve risks and uncertainties that may affect the company’s operations, markets, products, services, prices and other factors as discussed in the Dow or Huntsman companies’ filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Significant risks and uncertainties may relate to, but are not limited to, financial, economic, competitive, environmental, political, legal, regulatory and technological factors. The companies assume no obligation to provide revisions to any forward-looking statements should circumstances change, except as otherwise required by applicable laws.

Steve Shields talks about AWPA Modifications

I appreciated the opportunity to participate in the treated wood panel discussion at the recent NADRA meeting.  It provided an opportunity to discuss recent changes to standards that have impacted not only how treated wood is recommended to be used, but have also encouraged more retailers to stock ground contact treated wood so that users can be less concerned about potential misapplication.  Just as important was the opportunity for me to hear comments directly from builders on shortcomings of the treated wood that they have experienced.  I believe that increased involvement of NADRA and other organizations representing retailers and users of treated wood in AWPA can result in continued improvement of standards and better treated wood products for users.

There are new rules for building decks and using treated wood.  Just as the American Wood Council updated its “Prescriptive Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide” in 2014 with new recommendations and methods, the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) has updated its standards with new information on how treated wood is to be used.  As associations involved with developing code requirements or standards that are referenced in the codes, both are continually looking for ways to improve the methods and materials used in wood deck construction.

AWPA is recognized by ANSI as a consensus standard writing organization and its standards are referenced in the International Building Code and International Residential Code.

Products not specifically listed in AWPA standards often use ICC Evaluation Service product reports as a means to demonstrate that products comply with the requirements of the codes.

AWPA has updated standard U1 and now requires that for use of sawn lumber in certain above ground applications that are either (1) subject to ground contact type hazards or (2) critical to the structure and difficult to replace now be treated for ground contact.  These applications include:

a) When there is a reasonable expectation that soil, vegetation, leaf litter or other debris may build up and remain in contact with the component.

b) When the construction itself, other structures or anticipated vegetation growth will not allow air to circulate underneath the construction and between decking boards.

c) When components are installed less than six inches above ground (final grade after landscaping) and supported on permeable building materials (e.g. treated wood or concrete).

d) When components are in direct contact with non-durable untreated wood, or any older construction with any evidence of decay.

e) When components are wetted on a frequent or recurrent basis (e.g., on a freshwater floating dock or by a watering system).

f) When components are used in tropical climates

AWPA M4 requires that treated wood that has been cut, drilled or damaged including abrasions or holes from removal of nails and spikes should be field treated with preservative.  While this has seldom been done in the central and eastern United States, it has been common practice on the west coast and in Canada.  Field treatment helps to protect the interior of the wood which has less treatment than the outer shell.

Preservative end cut solutions shall be used in accordance with the instructions and precautions listed on the product label. Acceptable end cut solutions for outdoor projects referenced in the M4 standard include:

(a) Copper naphthenate. Preferably containing 2.0% copper metal; 1.0% is OK if the higher in not available.

(b) Oxine copper. Containing a minimum 0.675% oxine copper (0.12% copper metal).

If suitable products cannot be found locally, an Amazon search for wood preservatives will give a number of options for copper naphthenate products.  Using the link http://www.chemtch.com/outlast-q8-pressure-treated-wood will take you to the supplier of the oxine copper product in quarts, gallons or 5 gallon pails.  While somewhat more expensive it is clear and has little odor.

AWPA M4 also requires that timbers used as columns should have an original factory end in the ground and that the top be field treated with preservative.

These changes to AWPA have encouraged many retailers to make ground contact treated wood available to their customers.  Builders requesting ground contact treatment will help to ensure this practice continues and provide you with a supply of treated wood product that will be durable regardless of the specific application.

Stephen C. Shields

Steve spent over 43 years in the wood preservation industry with Koppers Company and successor organizations until his retirement as Technical Director of Lonza’s wood protection business in May 2016.  He remains active in the industry, providing technical consulting services as the principal of Wood Protection Consulting, LLC.

He graduated from Pennsylvania State University in 1972 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Wood Science and Technology and from Akron University in 1982 with a Masters in Business Administration.

Steve’s experience includes sales and customer support for preservative and fire retardant products, product development and research, technical product and plant production support, quality control, code and standards development and technical writing. He has been an active member of many associations including the American Wood Protection Association (1984- ), International Code Congress (and predecessor code organizations 1985- ), National Institute of Building Sciences, Wood Protection Council (1990-93) and the Western Wood Preservers Institute (1994 – 2016).

His primary activities now focus on American Wood Protection Association standard development and task group activities and building code evaluation reports.  He recently was awarded the American Wood Protection Association, Award of Merit for his service and contributions to the organization.

Koppers’, Todd Greer talks about AWPA Modifications

It was great to meet and speak directly with NADRA members at the Atlanta meeting. We look forward to working with the organization, and encouraging communication within our industry. Koppers believes it is important to provide a unified source of information for deck building professionals to learn more about the use of treated wood products and technologies.

The main reason for the new Standard change is to address misuse of ABOVE GROUND treated wood products.  ABOVE GROUND treated products shall not be used in ground contact, or subjected to hazards comparable to ground contact. If components such as a deck joist, or support beam are critical to the performance and safety of the system and would be difficult to maintain, repair or replace, then those components shall be treated to GROUND CONTACT Standard. ABOVE GROUND treated wood products, regardless of the preservative system, will perform only in “above ground” end use applications. Applying a little bit of common sense and good judgment will in most cases, lead to the logical and safest conclusion; that joists and beams in the majority of decks and fresh water docks should be treated to the GROUND CONTACT Standard.

  • In February of this year, the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) passed a U1 Standard change affecting above ground and ground contact treated wood products.
  • This Standard change officially became effective in July 2016, when the AWPA Book of Standards was published.
  • The new Standard change is affecting treated wood purchasing practices of home centers and lumberyards throughout the U.S. Many retailers are now ordering ground contact treated 2” lumber and decking to meet the new requirements.
  • The new AWPA Standard change is not confusing or hard to apply.
  • The AWPA Book of Standards states, “AWPA Standard U1 is the primary standard for specifiers, such as architects and engineers, but also for end users and building code officials. This Standard contains the information needed by specifiers in order to select a product that best suits their needs.”
  • The AWPA Standard change establishes new guidelines for when wood shall be treated to the UC4A Ground Contact General Use category in situations that simulate ground contact, such as:
  • When there is a reasonable expectation that soil, vegetation, leaf litter or other debris may build up and remain in contact with the component.
  • When the construction itself, other structures or anticipated vegetation growth will not allow air flow to circulate underneath the construction and between decking boards.
  • When components are installed less than six inches above ground (final grade after landscaping) and supported on permeable building materials (e.g. treated wood or concrete).
  • When components are in direct contact with non-durable untreated wood, or any older construction with any evidence of decay.
  • When components are wetted on a frequent or reoccurring basis (e.g. on a freshwater floating dock or by a watering system)
  • When components are used in tropical climates.
  • In addition, the new AWPA Standard states that above ground wood components, including joists and beams for decks and fresh water docks, shall be treated to Ground Contact UC4A when they would be:
  • Difficult to maintain, repair, or replace; and
  • Critical to the performance and safety of the entire system.
  • Applying a little bit of common sense and good judgment will, in most cases, will lead to the logical — and safest — conclusion that joists and beams in the majority of decks and fresh water docks shall be treated to the Ground Contact Standard.
  • The bottom line is that if a deck joist and/or a support beam are critical to the performance and safety of the system and would be difficult to maintain, repair or replace, then wood treated to the Ground Contact Standard shall be used.
  • Above Ground treated wood products, regardless of the preservative system, will perform only in “above ground” end use applications.
  • The main reason for the new Standard change is to address misuse of above ground treated wood used in ground contact or in applications that are physically above ground but are subject to hazards comparable to ground contact exposures or are used in applications involving components that are critical to safety and performance and will be difficult to maintain, repair or replace.
  • The new Standard change will help address the misuse of above ground treated wood products.

To learn more, please visit: www.kopperspc.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Greer

Todd Greer is the Director of North American Sales and Service for Koppers Performance Chemicals. His experience in the treated lumber industry includes 21 years with Timber Products Inspection, both in the field and in management of several programs.  Todd joined the Koppers team to focus on Customer Development and Quality Control.

Viance’s, Chris Kollwitz talks about AWPA Modifications

We wanted to thank the entire NADRA organization for the opportunity to meet with some of the leading deck builders in the industry, at NADRA’s regional meeting in Atlanta.

As beautiful custom wood framed decks and outdoor projects are constructed by NADRA members, they should be guided by the latest, most accurate information available.

Recent updates to the 2016 American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) Use Category System for treated wood, which include modifications to the section that outlines proper applications of Above Ground (UC3B) and Ground Contact (UC4A) treated wood, are causing some confusion in the industry.

Unfortunately, some retailers and wood treatment companies have misinterpreted the language to mean that only ground contact lumber meets the updated AWPA Use Category System standard for deck framing applications. That is not the case.

When it comes to residential decks projects, here’s what you need to know.

  • Despite what some in the industry are communicating, the AWPA U1 Use Category System (UCS), and the IRC® and IBC® building codes continue to allow Above Ground (UC3B) treated wood for common deck applications.
  • There is NO requirement to use Ground Contact materials for ALL Above Ground decks.
  • Above Ground (UC3B) wood treated under the AWPA U1 standards remains Code Compliant for deck framing, joists, beams, decking surfaces and railing systems, while using the appropriate amount of preservatives required to protect the wood from decay and termite attack.
  • Look for the CheckMark® on treated wood end tags. Only wood treated to the AWPA standards is third-party inspected and bears the CheckMark® of quality on end tags. Be sure to use products endorsed with the CheckMark logo.
  • Viance has reaffirmed its warranty coverage on treated wood products, and will continue to extend the terms of its Lifetime Limited Warranty for Above Ground (UC3B) treated wood products when used properly.
  • The preservative levels required to meet the AWPA UC4A ground contact standard not only increases the likelihood of higher project expense through more expensive wood, it also increases the chemical needed to complete projects. Above ground treated wood remains code compliant for most common decking applications while using the appropriate amount of preservative to ensure performance. Why use more chemicals than necessary?

To learn more about the revisions to the AWPA-UCS standard and why Above Ground treatments are still the best choice in treated wood, visit www.treatedwood.com/options. Viance is an ICC Preferred Education Provider and offers an accredited Continuing Education Course (CEU) course: Code Compliant Treated Wood for Residential Deck Construction

We are happy to review any questions you may have, email them to codequestions@viance.net.

Thank you

Chris Kollwitz

Christopher Kollwitz

Viance – Treated Wood Solutions

Director of Marketing

NADRA member since 2009

Contact Info:

Email: ckollwitz@viance.net

Office: 800-421-8661

 Over 30 Years Building Products Sales and Marketing with a focus on process improvement, product training, merchandising, events and business development programs.

  • 8 Years with Hechinger Co. in Washington DC
  • 14 years with Georgia-Pacific Building Products
  • 8 years with Viance – Treated Wood Solutions.
  • Currently responsible for the development and management of Viance marketing initiatives and execution.

AWPA U1 Standard Revisions Appealed

 

AWPA U1 Standard Revisions Appealed Due To Lack of Data and Data Omission

Sunbelt Forest Products Appeal AWPA U1 Standard Revisions; Requests Changes Be Rescinded

May 31, 2016, 09:00 ET from Sunbelt Forest Products

 

BARTOW, Fla., May 31, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Sunbelt Forest Products has announced that it will file, this week, an appeal of the American Wood Protection Association’s (AWPA’s) recent revisions to the U1 standard for above ground outdoor wood applications. The revision recommends the use of ground contact lumber for outdoor structure components that are “difficult to maintain, repair or replace and are critical to the performance and safety of the entire system construction.”

The appeal to the AWPA’s Executive Committee will be based on the fact that important technical data on product performance was omitted during the presentation on the proposed change.

“The proponents of these changes violated Section 5.5 of the AWPA Technical Committee Regulations requiring revisions be based upon relevant and adequate supporting data and Section 7.3, which requires that proposals to adjust standards be accompanied by a written statement that relevant data was not omitted,” said Ken DelleDonne president of Sunbelt Forest Products. During the presentation, proponents (which use a micronized copper azole treatment system for above ground lumber) showed photos of structural failures with above ground treated wood that they claimed were representative of widespread problems. They did not present actual statistical data to back up these claims, however.

“But this spring, when these same proponents were seeking to have micronized treatment standardized by the AWPA, they were suddenly able to produce data showing its efficacy in above ground applications.  This was in direct contrast to the statements they made during the consideration of the revision, and would have likely materially impacted the outcome of the proposal consideration,” DelleDonne added.

“This was four-year-old data that they certainly were familiar with before the submission of the proposal to modify the U1 standard and that should have been presented during the consideration of its revision,” DelleDonne said.  “According to AWPA bylaws, if data is withheld the proponent should be advised to either provide written explanation as to why the data was withheld or to resubmit the proposal at a later date to include relevant data.”

Any explanation for the data omission would be suspect, he said. “It seems highly unlikely that the same proponent who had only pictures to show during the revision presentation was unaware of the existence of this data that would have created legitimate concerns about the need for any changes in the U1 standard.”

“If the AWPA is going to remain the standard bearer for the pressure treated industry, it must recognize the questions about the validity of these important guidelines, questions that are raised by the omission of key existing data, whether intentional or accidental,” DelleDonne said. “The AWPA’s responsibility is to get the standards right on an industry-changing guideline like this one. We need to reconsider the proposal with all the facts, not just a few pieces of select information.”

Causes for concern: Commercialization, environmental impact and unnecessary costs

Sunbelt Forest Products is also expressing some misgivings about the possible commercialization of the AWPA U1 standard by members who could benefit from the changes. DelleDonne said the issue is important because the revised U1 ground contact standards have caused confusion in the industry and have caused unwarranted price increases. They could also be harmful to the environment long term.

“Some retailers and wood treatment companies appear to be under the mistaken impression that all treated wood used in outdoor applications must meet ground contact standards. But this is not the case,” he continued. Most recently, the AWPA T1 Education Task Force, a subgroup of the Technical Committee, worked in conjunction with the Softwood Lumber Board and Western Wood Preservers Institute to produce an infographic on the recent U1 standard revision that shows very clearly that joists and beams can use lumber treated to UC3B above ground, exterior construction standards.

Despite this graphic, certain producers and suppliers are forcing their retail and contractor customers to switch to all ground-contact wood because they say it is required by the AWPA revision. When only ground contact wood is available, retailers and contractors are forced to pay higher costs not only for the more heavily treated lumber but also for the more robust fasteners required with such wood. There are also environmental concerns, since ground contact lumber contains more copper than wood treated for above ground use.

“Large treaters, representing 70% of the total market, have used this revision as the basis for forcing their customers to all ground contact material, resulting in a 15% increase or more in retail prices,” DelleDonne said. “The rationale for the revisions was said to be misapplication of above ground treated products by consumers, however, our data shows misapplication occurs significantly less than 1% annually, making the revisions unnecessary and a costly correction to a problem that occurs once out of millions of successful installations.”

He also noted that even if there is a problem, it may be related to the type of treatment used for above ground wood. Companies that treat wood with Ecolife, ACQ and CAC have not experienced the quantity of problems that the non- AWPA standardized micronized treatment customers are reporting with their above ground lumber.

There are also concerns about the adoption of the revised AWPA standard by the International Building Code (IBC) and the International Residential Code (IRC). Both serve as the basis for state and local building codes in the U.S. and both reference AWPA Standard U1 in their requirements for deck construction.

“We are on a slippery slope of adding significant cost and environmental implications to the entire building construction industry on a revision based entirely upon irrelevant, incomplete data,” said DelleDonne. “The whole issue needs more discussion–and discussion backed this time by all available hard data.”

Specific requests in appeal

Sunbelt Forest Products will formally request several actions in its appeal of the revision to the Executive Committee:

  • Rescind the AWPA Standard U1 2015 revisions relating to above ground and ground contact due to lack of relevant data and procedural abeyance resulting from data omission
  • Resubmit the revision proposal at a later date including ALL relevant data.
  • Immediately withdraw, prior to official printing, the U1 2015 revisions relating to above ground contact from the AWPA’s 2016 Book of Standards
  • Notify the ICC to withdraw ICC AC326 Revisions as the AWPA U1 standard is in question due to data omission and lack of relevant data.
  • Notify the IBC and IRC that the revisions to AWPA U1 standard is in question due to data omission and lack of relevant data.

The AWPA by-laws state the Executive Committee will give written notification of its decision. Given the immediate ramifications of the proposed revisions, Sunbelt Forest Products is going to request expedited consideration of its appeal.

Sunbelt Forest Products of Bartow, Florida, a wholly owned subsidiary of PalletOne, Inc., is one of the largest pressure treaters in the Southeast. Operating three locations in Alabama and Florida, Sunbelt’s manufacturing capabilities exceed 300 million board feet of pressure treated wood per year.

 

SOURCE Sunbelt Forest Products

 

AWPA and ICC Approve New Treated Wood Standards

NEWS RELEASE

Contact: Michael Beaudry
NADRA Executive VP
215-679-4884
Info@NADRA.org
 

 AWPA and ICC Approve New Treated Wood Standards

ICC-ES AC326 – The  ICC final effective date of implementation is July 15, 2016.

Quakertown, PA (February 16th, 2016) Many of you may or may not be aware of the discussions that have been taking place regarding potential changes to Treated Wood Standards moving many structural and critical items to a Ground Contact treatment retention level.

Those New Standards have now passed the AWPA (American Wood Protection Association) and the ICC (International Code Council). The ICC final effective date of implementation is July 15, 2016.

NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the Deck and Railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers.

This mission includes the promotion of proper deck construction, deck safety and ultimately serving the best interest of the consumer. While the Association is made up of professionals from all industry segments, we are aware that consumers use a significant amount of treated wood in DIY projects. The consumer is usually not knowledgeable enough to be able to know the proper uses for which treated wood product they are buying and therefore misuse and misapplication can occur.

Ground Contact treatment is necessary for physically above-ground material when:

  • Soil or other debris may build up and stay in contact with the wood
  • There is insufficient ventilation to allow air circulation around the wood
  • Material is installed <6 inches above the ground
  • Material is installed in contact with non-durable untreated or older construction with any evidence of decay
  • Wood is subject to frequent or recurring wetting
  • Wood is used in tropical climates
  • The wood is both:
    • Difficult to maintain, repair or replace and
    • Critical to the performance and safety of the entire system

Joists and beams for decks and docks fit both of these final criteria and therefore require Ground Contact treatment. Other Ground Contact applications include Ledgers, Posts, Step Stringers and Decking used at Ground Level and on Walkways.

ICC-ES AC326 Sample Table - The ICC final effective date is July 15, 2016

NADRA looks forward to the implementation of the New Standards as a step forward in the industry to providing those who enjoy Outdoor Living with a better, safer improved product and experience.

If you have questions, comments or concerns regarding these changes, please fill out the online form found HERE

Please visit www.NADRA.org to learn more about your Association, it’s mission, education and services that it provides to industry professionals and consumers.

ABOUT NADRA

NADRA is made up of deck builders, inspectors, manufacturers, dealers/distributors, wholesalers, retailers, lumberyards, outdoor living professionals and service providers to the deck and railing industry. By working together, we can be one voice for the industry and deliver a clear message to the consumer and the code development bodies. NADRA serves as a trade association with emphasis on safe building practices, and deck safety.

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Copyright 2016,  The North American Deck and Railing Association, NADRA.  This material may not be  rewritten or redistributed without following these instructions:

If you would like to use this Press Release, please include Info@NADRA.org in your communication. Use only an excerpt, followed by this exact link to read the Press Release in its entirety: http://bit.ly/AWPAICCNewTreatedWoodStandards  Thank you!