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May 5th, 2016

News Release

Contact: Michael Beaudry
NADRA Executive VP
215-679-4884
Info@NADRA.org 

May is Deck Safety Month® – Deck Safety Tips for Homeowners

QUAKERTOWN, PA – The North American Deck and Railing Association declared May as Deck Safety Month®. NADRA’s Campaign for deck safety awareness is an effort to promote outdoor living in a beautiful and safe environment. During Deck Safety Month® the experts at NADRA are offering safety tips for homeowners and encouraging you to Check Your Deck®.

“It’s springtime and we all want to get out and enjoy our decks,” says Bob Lett, vice president of national sales for WOLF Home Products. “NADRA wants to help keep homeowners safe. Deck maintenance means so much more than just cleaning your deck. It means making sure your entire deck structure is in good, safe order. Just like your car, you need to evaluate, ‘tune up’ and keep your deck in safe operating condition on a regular basis. These checklists from NADRA can help you do just that.”

A key element to enjoying your deck for years to come is making sure it is safe. NADRA’s “10-Point Consumer Safety Checklist” is an efficient way to take a good look at the different parts of your deck, with an eye to what might need maintenance, repair or replacement. The checklist can be found at http://bit.ly/NADRA10PointConsumerChecklist.

Homeowners should consider a professional deck inspection. “A professional inspector will thoroughly examine your deck, provide information on your deck’s capacity limits, identify any dangerous problem areas and give you some insight of what to keep your eye on in the future,” says Beaudry. NADRA provides industry professionals with a Deck Evaluation Form that is available here: http://bit.ly/NADRADeckEvaluationForm, along with a new online Deck Evaluation Form (Beta Test). This is the latest iteration of NADRA’s Deck Evaluation Form. It’s easy to use and allows deck professionals the ability to save and print deck inspection results. The online form includes inspection items such as stairs, footings, beams/joists, ledger, boards/surface, rails/guards and more. Visit CheckYourDeck.org to test it out.

“We recommend ASHI-certified home inspectors or a knowledgeable deck builder for inspections of older decks,” says Beaudry. “Our NADRA member deck builders are required to adhere to a code of ethics and comply with state licensing and insurance requirements. This brings peace of mind to homeowners using our NADRA members.”

Deck inspection requires special knowledge, expertise and experience. To find a professional deck builder and inspector, please visit www.NADRA.org.

The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is dedicated to increasing public awareness of the necessity for regular inspection and maintenance of existing decks and proper installation of new decks. For more information visit www.NADRA.org

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May 20th, 2015

News Release

Contact: Michael Beaudry
NADRA Executive VP
215-679-4884
info@NADRA.org
 

Deck Safety Tips for Homeowners

QUAKERTOWN, PA – During Deck Safety Month® the experts at the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) are offering safety tips for homeowners and encouraging you to Check Your Deck®.

“It’s springtime and we all want to get out and enjoy our decks,” says Bob Lett, vice president of market development for WOLF Home Products. “NADRA wants to help keep homeowners safe. Deck maintenance means so much more than just cleaning your deck. It means making sure your entire deck structure is in good, safe order. Just like your car, you need to evaluate, ‘tune up’ and keep your deck in safe operating condition on a regular basis. This checklist from NADRA can help you do just that.”

Key areas of the deck to check during Deck Safety Month® include:

1 – Search for split or decaying wood. Check several different areas of the deck to be sure the wood is still sound, including the ledger board (where the deck attaches to the house and a common source of deck failure), support posts and joists under the deck, deck boards, railings and stairs. Look for soft, spongy areas in wood that can indicate insect damage or decay.

2 –  Test railings and banisters. Assure the security of these key pieces of the deck by gently pushing on them to assure they are firmly attached with no “give” that could indicate failure. Then, get the yard stick out. Most codes require a 36” high railing (and usually encourage 42” high railings) with rails placed no more than 4” inches apart (measured from the inside of the rails) to keep small children and pets from squeezing through.

3. Check your fasteners. Over time, fasteners may “pop” from wood, loosen or even corrode. Check nails, screws or anchors and reinforce or replace anything that looks suspicious.

4 – Step carefully. Check each step to make certain of security and lack of decay. If an area behind the stair treads is open, this opening should be no more than 4” high. A fast tip is to also keep stair pathways clear of planters, décor, toys and other items that can present a tripping hazard.

5. Clean up debris. Make it a priority to clean away leaves, branches or other debris from your deck. When left in place, these can be slippery and promote mildew. If you’re already seeing mildew on the deck, or the deck coating has worn away, now is the time to clean and apply a new waterproof coating.

“Your deck and stairs should appear even without sagging, and should not sway or move when tested,” says Lett. “Plus, it’s important to check on anything used on the deck, such as grills, lighting, storage and furnishings. Making these easy evaluations part of your yearly springtime maintenance can help keep your entire family safe.”

For a complete 10-point consumer safety checklist and more deck safety tips from NADRA, click HERE

The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is dedicated to increasing public awareness of the necessity for regular inspection and maintenance of existing decks and proper installation of new decks. For more information visit www.NADRA.org 

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April 29th, 2015

QUAKERTOWN, PA – Your deck is the perfect place to enjoy warm weather with friends and loved ones. However, a poorly maintained or unsafe deck could possibly collapse, causing serious injuries to you and your guests. During Deck Safety Month® in May, experts at the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) recommend homeowners Check Your Deck® before starting to plan family activities.
“Our number one priority and message to the public is to ensure that the decks they use are safe,” says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of NADRA. “Outdoor structures like decks are exposed to sun, rain, snow and extreme temperature changes over the years. The need to maintain and inspect them is critical for keeping decks strong and safe.”

NADRA has created campaigns and educational programs, along with certifications for home inspectors, deck builders, remodelers, builders, code officials, engineers, architects, distributors, lumberyards and manufacturers to improve proper installation practices. The organization has also developed checklists and safety awareness information for consumers to assure they have details available to them to evaluate their decks. The information can be found HERE.

With an estimated 40 million residential and 10 million commercial decks in the United States that are more than 20-30 years old, it’s important for homeowners to check their deck on a yearly basis.

Consumer Checklist

A key element to enjoying your deck for years to come is making sure it is safe and code compliant. NADRA’s “10-Point Consumer Safety Checklist” is an efficient way to take a good look at the different parts of your deck, with an eye to what might need maintenance, repair or replacement. The checklist can be found at http://bit.ly/NADRA10PointConsumerChecklist.

Homeowners should consider a professional deck inspection. “A professional inspector will thoroughly examine your deck, provide information on your deck’s capacity limits, identify any dangerous problem areas and give you some insight of what to keep your eye on in the future,” says Beaudry. “NADRA provides industry professionals with a Deck Evaluation Form that is available HERE.

Older decks require closer scrutiny and regular inspections. Many decks were built before code requirements were established to protect consumers. Some of these older decks may have deck-to-house attachments using only nails instead of the current recommended construction using deck tension hardware that greatly helps in the prevention of ledger failures.

“We recommend ASHI-certified home inspectors or a knowledgeable deck builder for inspections of older decks,” says Beaudry. “Our NADRA member deck builders are required to adhere to a code of ethics and comply with state licensing and insurance requirements. This brings peace of mind to homeowners using our NADRA members.”

Deck inspection requires special knowledge, expertise and experience. NADRA offers training and certification for its members along with ASHI home inspectors and others interested in professional deck inspection. For additional information on NADRA certification classes, click HERE.

The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is dedicated to increasing public awareness of the necessity for regular inspection and maintenance of existing decks and proper installation of new decks. For more information visit www.NADRA.org 

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April 23rd, 2013

May is Deck Safety Month ®

In 2006 NADRA, The North American Deck and Railing Association declared May as Deck Safety Month®. NADRA’s Deck safety program is an effort to improve deck safety awareness!

Here are some helpful ways to promote Deck Safety during the month of May! Please call NADRA direct with any questions you may have: 215.679.4884 or email: Info@NADRA.org. We are here to help!

Tips to Promote Deck Safety Awareness: Download the PDF now to learn ways to spread the word! Click HERE.

Visit NADRA’s Deck Safety Webpage for links to the Deck Safety Month® Video, Deck Evaluation Form & The Consumer Checklist

*** Exclusive Offer to NADRA Members: 

The association is now producing professional quality, custom videos for NADRA members. The video itself can be customized with your logo, contact information and photos.

Help spread the word about Deck Safety Awareness!

 

Pictures and text are no longer enough to stand out. That’s why video can have dramatic effect on point-of-sale conversation rates for products, services as well as provide significant boost in search engine rankings. Get noticed on listing sites and FaceBook!

 

  • High definition file! Good for online, HD TV, or a projector!
  • Add to your YouTube channel
  • Embed the video in your website or blog!
  • Add video to your social media pages
  • Drive visitors to your website
Get started today by calling: 1.888.623.7248 or Email: Info@NADRA.org

Custom Videos Start at Just $99

A very Special Thank you to Fiberon for Sponsoring Deck Safety Month 2013!
October 29th, 2012

Protect the inside and outside of your home before a hurricane comes!

With Hurricane Sandy bearing down on the Northeastern US, here are some critical things you must do to prepare your deck:

Article by: Advantage Trim and Lumber

  1. Bring in all planters and any loose items – Any loose item left on or even under your deck will turn into a missile in the midst of hurricane force winds. You might be tempted to tie down certain items, but we caution against this since it is a temporary solution that most times won’t stand up to the 75+ MPH winds of a hurricane.
  2. Dunk your patio furniture – A tip that most Floridians know is that a secure place to store patio furniture is in the pool. That’s right. Carefully place your metal or plastic patio furniture inside your pool and you won’t have to worry about it being swept away or damaged. If your outdoor furniture has a glass top, or if you don’t have a pool, bring it inside.
  3. Secure any loose boards or railing! – If you notice any loose railing, spindles, or deck boards, secure them with the proper fasteners. The last thing you want is to undertake any preventable deck repairs. Don’t bother using nails since they offer no lasting holding power. Use stainless steel screws meant for outdoor use only.
  4. Don’t go out on your deck during the storm, ever – Remember just because you took the time to prepare your deck for a hurricane doesn’t mean that your neighbors did. Don’t go out on your deck during the storm since flying debris can inflict major damage to you and your family. The last thing you want is for someone to get injured and no way to get medical attention.

If you live anywhere near the coast of Delaware, Washington DC, Maryland, New Jersey and New York, we encourage you to heed any and all warnings. Remember, even if you’re not worried about the wind, water damage, especially near the coast, storm surge is a reality. Take care and stay safe!

May 15th, 2012

New NADRA Video Educates Consumers about Deck Safety Month®

May 15, 2012 - Quakertown, PA | in 2006 NADRA, The North American Deck and Railing Association declared May as Deck Safety Month®. NADRA’s Deck safety program is an effort to save lives and prevent injuries.

After 6 years of promoting May as Deck Safety Month®, the association decided on a new method of reaching the masses this year. The new video was produced using images and text to drive a strong message to consumers about NADRA’s Check Your Deck® evaluation forms and the 10-point checklist. The video can be found on NADRA’s website at www.NADRA.org. The association posted the video to their YouTube channel found under NADRAYT and to their Social Media fan pages.

Michael Beaudry, Executive VP of NADRA states, “Our number one priority to the public is to ensure that the decks they and their families enjoy are safe. NADRA takes this responsibility seriously, and has created campaigns and education programs and certifications for home inspectors, code officials, engineers, architects, builders, distributors, lumberyards and manufacturers to improve proper installation practices along with checklists and safety awareness information for consumers to follow.”

The video can be used in making the consumer aware of the necessity of choosing a professional deck contractor, providing regular maintenance and inspection, and knowing the limits of the deck structure.

Read the rest of this entry »

March 12th, 2012

March 12, 2012 | Decks are a great “value add” for residents, but property managers face plenty of risks—including having a deck collapse—if their deck isn’t regularly inspected and maintained. It’s happening more frequently than many property managers and homeowners realize. Between 2003 and 2007, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 224,740 injuries caused by outdoor decks and porches. “What’s happening across this country is an epidemic at this point,” says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA), adding that “in most cases if a deck fails, it’s a matter of neglect.”

The Ledger Connection

Common deck failures include a stair collapsing or a railing giving way. Of all the parts of a deck, “the most notoriously overlooked has been the ledger connection,” says Glenn Mathewson, a former deck builder and technical advisor to NADRA and International Code Council-certified Master Code Professional. The ledger connection is the board that connects the deck to a home or property, which can rot away, causing the deck to completely collapse. But, adds Mathewson, “poor construction and a lack of standards for construction is a large contributor to the problem.”

Not maintaining and regularly inspecting the deck, especially the ledger, puts your deck at risk for a collapse—and puts your occupants at risk for injury. “The lack of maintenance and the lack of knowledge of poor condition of the materials would be a due-diligence risk,” Mathewson says. “It would be like allowing the paint to peel off a house, but with much more drastic results.”

Read the rest of this entry »

August 2nd, 2010

Austin, TX – August 1, 2010 | A man and woman who survived a deck collapse at a condominium in South Austin Sunday morning returned to the scene this afternoon to get their belongings.

“It was like boom boom and then you heard everyone screaming ‘help, help,’” said Erica Hagar, 21, who was among the 30 people on the wooden deck attached to the condominium unit when it collapsed. “It was a nightmare.”

According to police, residents at the Garden Court Condominiums located near Oltorf Street and Sunridge Drive in South Austin, were hosting a party and many of the guests were on the balcony at the time of the collapse.

You can view the rest of the story and the related video at www.kxan.com.