National Nail Launches Versatile CAMO® LEVER™ Tool for Fast, Easy Deck Board Bending

Grand Rapids, MI– At CAMO, we know that you don’t have time to wrestle with deck boards –time is precious during installation and crews are getting smaller. Not to mention the strain on the body and potential board damage. As part of the CAMO experience that delivers ease, efficiency and profitability, CAMO® LEVER™ is the only tool needed to bend, straighten or align deck boards to speed up installation. In fact, contractors can build decks up to 5X times faster when they use LEVER with other CAMO innovations like the versatile DRIVE™ stand-up tool for any decking and CAMO EDGE Clip for grooved boards. In these difficult times, the CAMO team knows that COVID-19 is a challenge for deck builders as they try to protect their families and livelihoods. That is why we’re forging ahead with the latest innovation.

Contractors can build decks up to 5X times faster when they use new LEVER with other CAMO innovations like the versatile DRIVE™ stand-up tool for any decking and CAMO EDGE Clips for grooved boards.

LEVER is all about freedom during installation. Without time-consuming set-up, the unique LEVER tool sets in one turn to lock boards in place for fastening with no strain, no hassle. When combined with CAMO EDGE Clips, LEVER speeds up grooved decking installations by locking multiple rows of boards and clips in place for quick fastening. The compact LEVER is also strong enough to straighten any warped board. Smaller crews are not a problem—LEVER eliminates the need to have someone holding boards, or a tool, in place. Lay your boards down, lock them in place with LEVER and you are free to fasten. And the timing of the LEVER launch aligns with the need for one- or two-person installation that allows social distancing on the jobsite to protect worker safety. 

“We are unwavering in our mission to help contractors build a better deck easier and in a faster timeframe–even with smaller crews,” said W. Scott Baker, CEO.  “CAMO LEVER is the latest addition to the family of innovative CAMO products that gives contractors an unparalleled deck-building experience.  We’re dedicated to helping our contractors stay on the job as well as emerge strong from the pandemic.”

The versatile LEVER tool adjusts to single, double and even steel joists and keeps spacing between boards consistent, which, for the discerning deck builder, adds to the beauty of a fastener-free surface. For the best installation experience, lock in a whole field of boards using 2–3 LEVERS across the length of the deck. 

With an MSRP of $99.95, CAMO LEVER is an affordable, easy-to-use innovation that allows contractors to work smarter, with less labor, and helps them build a better deck.

To learn more about the CAMO LEVER, visit camofasteners.com

About CAMO    

CAMO exists to provide the best deck fastening installation experience for hardworking folks who take pride in their work and value their wallet. That’s you. Whether you install decks for a living, offer to help build them with a buddy, or maybe build just one in your lifetime, CAMO products are engineered to save you time and ensure your work looks and performs as you expect it should. CAMO®. The Better Way to Build a Deck. 

For more information or to locate a dealer, visit camofasteners.com or call 1-800-968-6245. Be sure to “Like” @camofasteners on Facebook and @camodeckfasteners on Instagram. Search CAMO Fasteners on YouTube to find our channel or check us out on Pinterest.

If Customers Were Always Right, We Would Go Broke

By: Bobby Parks

 “The customer’s always right”. It’s a common saying that some may believe, but fortunately it’s not true or we would all go broke. We would throw in the towel whenever a customer claimed something was wrong, make fixes that had nothing to do with us for free, or give them at no cost what they mistakenly thought they were supposed to receive. And we would be firing our people once a month because the customer claimed they did something wrong. Imagine the cost drain that would occur. Restaurant and retail store managers may be able to give away meals and smaller items to make a customer happy and go away, but because our servings are more costly, we as contractors can’t afford to do the same. The trick is how you explain to them why they are not right without offending or losing them in the process.

It’s not to say we as contractors don’t make mistakes or create issues for ourselves, we do.  But often when issues arise or potential confrontations exist it’s because of a customer’s mistaken perception involving the scope of work, project options, or installation procedures. In rare cases, it’s a customer trying to get something for free. They see an opening and push the boundary to see if you will cave and donate to their project.

To be more specific, these undesirable communications occur when customers believe they are supposed to be getting something different than what they are getting or they believe something that is not included should be included. Often, it can include an existing condition or repair they believe should be part of the job. For example; they contracted for a deck and they believe the rot discovered after the job started at the attachment and around the fireplace bump out should be included.  Or it can be technical aspects about an installation. They’ve read something or someone told them something that makes them believe you are going about it incorrectly. In any case, how you respond matters.

Communication and Documentation

Most job confusion issues result from a lack of communication, documentation, and improperly set expectations. We all know there are plenty of legitimate issues that pop up; so why allow avoidable or mistakenly perceived problems to enter the mix?  When issues do occur, the objective should be to obtain a quick satisfactory resolution for all parties without relationship damage and keep the project moving forward. And without sacrificing profit!

Minimizing the potential for such adventures to occur should be a standard practice. Setting realistic expectations when contracting is much easier than setting them after the fact or while you are on the job. Writing up a contract agreement with a description of all relevant details as well as general operational clauses as to what a customer should expect and what you are responsible or not responsible for is a simple basic business practice.  Typically, I had 21 standard clauses in my contract before specifics were added. These standard clauses covered everything from delays due to weather, existing rot, unforeseen conditions, lawn damage responsibility, that material left over belonged to me, measurements are approximate, and even “rights to take and use pictures”. The list goes on and there’s a reason for every clause.

There’s A Lot Discussed & Less Included

Although lots of options and details are discussed during the consultation and designing phase, specific details and final elements that are included and agreed on must be documented as later it all runs together for most customers. So, in addition to the standard clauses of a contract, numerous specific details such as rail types, decking choices, and any pertinent choices are documented. For me, a design drawing that also included some details was signed off on.  Honest mistakes in memory occur with both parties, so having details benefits everyone and this alleviates or resolves a high percentage of issues when referred to. It should be comprehensive enough that a third party should be able to review a job file and know what’s being done. I also made it a point to include and attach photo examples of certain items and details to the package like rail types and trim finishes which I could refer to as well. I did this because customers don’t understand our assigned product titles or lingo, so this provided a visual that was an addendum to the contract and often used as examples when requesting HOA approvals.

From a technical and product standpoint most customers do their due diligence online. This should be expected and is good in that they can become somewhat educated regarding their investment. But it’s not good if they get bad information or interpret something that doesn’t apply to what you are doing. Chances are, the better the contractor is from a written detail and communication standpoint, the less likely these issues will come up and the more likely the customer is mistaken if it does. Now, the lesser prepared contractors will likely experience not only more issues, but the ones that come up will be trickier to resolve.

Customer confidence in who they choose as a contractor alleviates some potential issues as they trust you. If something does come up, my experience has been that they are more likely to believe you and assume they are mistaken. This comes from established credibility as a contractor and the relationship you have built with the customer.  This only carries you so far. I have learned that no matter what you do and how much you cover up front, problems can arise. On occasion we or our people do stumble, which compromises us and that is challenging to recover from. Acknowledging the obvious if you are wrong is the best way to begin to recover confidence and get the relationship back on track; but if you’re in the right…then standing your ground in a professional, confident, cordial, and unemotional way is how I’d handle it.

Managing the Conversation

So, for me these conversations always included an acknowledgement that I understand they believe something was included that they are not getting, or our technical approach is not what they expected. Often the first part was resolved by referring to the detailed notes or photos we all signed off on or what was on the drawings.

If a technical issue or question came up, I’d explain why we do what we do, why we can stand behind our building methods and why we might not if we did it another way. I did not let them engineer or dictate how I was going to structure a job or approach it from a technical standpoint as my warranty only applied if it was built to my own and code standards.  This assumes you have solid ground to stand on and you have not compromised yourself from a technical standpoint. Know what is required from both a code and the manufacturers aspect. For example: Customers find lots of information online with common searches involving pressure treated wood use, including, treating end cuts and stringers, or what voids a manufacturer’s warranty etc. Surprisingly, many contractors do not have a proper understanding of what is required with this aspect which can come back on them. To be caught on the wrong side of  obvious technical mistakes are not only embarrassing, but really does compromise you with a customer from a confidence standpoint. You should know that everything is just a “Google” search away for the customer.

There’s a Cost Either Way

Again, you can’t give away things just to make people happy, but for me if there was a gray area with minimal cost items or a slight repair that they thought was included and I believed they genuinely believed it, I looked at it like this. Sometimes there can be a bigger long-term cost if you do collect versus absorbing the hit. So, there can be a cost to you either way even if you collect money from a customer for a disputed item. The key is to determine which is the costliest. For example, you could stand your ground and charge a customer $300-$400 for something they disagreed was owed but would reluctantly agree to pay for. How will that $300-400 compare to the cost of having an unhappy customer you’re creating in the process? How will the rest of the job go now that they have an attitude? What kind of review will you receive? How many referrals will you receive from this customer? In the long run which choice cost you the most?

But let’s say it was a $1000, or some larger dollar value. I might take the pre-mentioned approach, but instead of absorbing the full amount I might offer to discount the work or split the cost with them. I would stress again that it wasn’t part of the job, but I realize they believe it was. Just to show an effort of good faith I would make the offer. But I would not give away the $1000. My experience has been that it’s the things you give away or give a deal on that are often the problem items on a job, so I don’t take these offers lightly. Also, I know that every percentage point matters, and small amounts multiplied add up over time so what you agree to from a dollar figure depends on the size of a job and what the percentages are. For example, you wouldn’t give up $300 on a $3000 job as that would be 10% of the project. But on a $30,000 project it would only be 1% and might be something you could live with.

Reasonable People and Reasonable Solutions

I’m a believer that reasonable people listen to reason and make decisions and reach conclusions based on reason, logic, and the practicalities involved. But I believe unreasonable people or the ones that are working you for something free are not fair minded and will not reach the same decision or conclusions. That’s where firmness, backbone, and written specific details and inclusion as well as exclusion cards must be played. Standing your ground in a professional and unemotional way at this point is just part of being a business owner and required for long term survival. Some customers are more difficult than others and how to deal with difficult and unreasonable customers is an article all to itself.

But my experience has been that if I listened to the customer first and then discussed a situation professionally with a reasonable and genuine effort and attitude to resolve it, my customer relationship was strengthened. For example If I made the decision to go ahead and do a minimal cost item even though technically I could get out of it and charge, but I knew the customer truly believed they were in the right, I’d do it in a way that had value. It might be “Look I’m sorry there has been a misunderstanding and I can understand you think this was included. It honestly is not but I want you to be happy and for this not to be a problem-we are going to handle it”. And I said it in a positive way. I didn’t say it with an attitude or in a reluctant resentful way. If you did the latter, you might as well have charged them as there is no gain.  I believe these customers often look back and remember that you did something that they often come to realize wasn’t part of the scope, but you did it anyway and you were nice about it.

Resolving Issues Properly Can Strengthen the Relationship

Ethical contractors strive to be fair and to satisfy their customers. Most customers are reasonable minded people just wanting us to meet their expectations that hopefully we as contractors have properly set. So, we must be fair to them but also to ourselves and to protect our businesses and livelihood and maintain a balance between the two. When practical and reasonable approaches discussed here are made and agreed upon, result in a cordial resolution; I believe these customers often give you the best reviews compared to the ones that had an uneventful experience. They have a more in-depth belief in you because the fairness and integrity test were passed versus a non-eventful delivery. Therefore, my experience has been that the contractor /customer relationship can become even stronger when an issue arises compared to a project that runs smoothly. I’m not saying you want more eventful jobs, only that if you take all the upfront precautions to cover yourself and it still happens, handle it in a manner that at the end of the day more than overcomes the few dollars you may have given on that job. Consider it an investment on your reputation and brand that creates fans of your company and may produce even stronger referrals compared to your typical jobs. And consider it a lesson learned and in some cases, an added clause to your next contract.

Bobby Parks / Instagram: @Bobbyparks007B


Check Your Deck® During Deck Safety Month® in May

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Michael Beaudry

Phone: 215-679-4884

Email: Info@NADRA.org


Check Your Deck® During Deck Safety Month® in May

QUAKERTOWN, PA – (April 24th, 2018) –The North American Deck and Railing Association declared May as Deck Safety Month®. Each year, NADRA raises awareness about the importance of checking your deck through a national deck safety campaign.

NADRA’s Deck Safety Campaign creates an opportunity to: Educate. Inspect. Correct; ultimately, helping to prevent injuries and bringing an awareness to the importance of regular deck inspections.

“Your roof has a life expectancy. Your windows have a life expectancy. What about your deck?” Says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of NADRA. “Consider the snowfall accumulations from just this past year. These heavy loads cause additional stress on outdoor structures and create a need to evaluate. It’s time to Check Your Deck®!”

Just like other products exposed to the environment, over time your deck will need to be replaced. Asphalt shingles have a life expectancy of about 20 years*.  Aluminum and vinyl windows are expected to last 15-20 years*. Beaudry continues… “With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired.”  It’s important for homeowners to check their deck on a yearly basis.

Educate: NADRA has created campaigns and educational programs, along with certifications for home inspectors, deck builders, remodelers, builders, code officials, engineers, architects, distributors, lumberyards and manufacturers to improve proper installation practices. NADRA’s Deck Evaluation/Certification Program has educated hundreds of Home Inspectors to help evaluate unsafe structures. Read more about the class here.

Inspect: Homeowners should consider a professional deck inspection. “A professional inspector will thoroughly examine your deck, provide information on your deck’s capacity limits, identify any dangerous problem areas and give you a map of what to keep your eye on in the future,” says Beaudry. Older decks require closer scrutiny and regular inspections. Many decks were built before code requirements were established to protect consumers. Some of these older decks may have deck-to-house attachments using only nails instead of the current recommended construction using deck tension hardware that greatly helps in the prevention of ledger failures. Deck inspection requires special knowledge, expertise and experience.

NADRA is working diligently with ASHI, The American Society of Home Inspectors, as well as, AIBD, The American Institute of Building Design. The associations are working towards educating and certifying thousands of industry professionals to meet the need for inspecting the millions of decks that are past their useful life. Homeowners can search for qualified inspectors at www.NADRA.org.

Correct: Through the evaluation and inspection of your deck, repairs and/ or replacement should be addressed. NADRA deck builders adhere to a strict code of ethics and are required to submit proof of licensing and insurance as required by their state. Homeowners can search for qualified deck builders at www.NADRA.org.


About NADRA:

The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of  deck builders, inspectors, manufacturers, dealers/distributors, lumberyards, wholesalers, retailers, and service providers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. Visit www.NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources.

*Source: National Association of HomeBuilders/Bank of America Home Equity, Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components 2/07.

© Copyright 2018 North American Deck and Railing Association. All rights reserved.

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NADRA Member Spotlight Winner: Woodland Deck Co., Steve Selkic

 

Company Name: Woodland Deck Co.
Member Name:  Steve Selkic
Member Category: Deck Builder
Location: Doylestown, OH

What inspired you to join NADRA?  To network and learn from other builders. As deck builders we run into a lot of the same challenges, and learning from each other helps us think outside the box.

When did you first get involved with this industry?  25 years ago.

What was the first thing you ever built? A fort in the woods. I grew up close to a forest and we spent a lot of time in there. Exploring around and building things was something that held me captive for hours at time. Kids stuff, pretending you are on the run and have to build a shelter… and whatever else we could think up.

We want to get to know you, please tell us a little about your business:  Woodland Deck Co. was established in 2000. So this is now our 18th year in business. It has been a blast but also very challenging. We specialize in low-maintenance decks and don’t venture too far from there. Pergolas, and deck lighting as well.

How do you define success?  I like John Wooden’s definition:

Success is peace of mind, which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to do your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming

What advice would you like to share with fellow members that you have learned in your career? Don’t eat yellow snow! jk. On a more serious note: You can always make more money, you can never make more time.

If you could ask your fellow industry professionals one question, what might it be?  How will the way we do business change in the next 10 years?

What would you do for a career if you weren’t doing this? A non-for-profit business coach. I would like to serve people in deprived countries and help them find a way to build sustainable business for their families.

A little more about Steve: I’m a father of 8 kids, and enjoy doing most things outdoors with them.  This seems to take up most of my free time. We recently did a RV cross-country trip which was a blast.  I’m hoping to do another trip, maybe next year?

Website:  WoodlandDeck.com 

Connect with Woodland Deck Co. on Social Media:

Instagram: @WoodlandDeck

NADRA Member Spotlight: Custom Design Group, Barry Fate

Company Name: Custom Design Group
Member Name:  Barry Fate
Position:  Owner
Member Category:  Builder
Location: Kalamazoo, MI

What inspired you to join NADRA? I’ve been building decks for over 40 years. I wanted to become part of an organization that dedicated itself to MY profession.

When did you first get involved with this industry? On a full time exclusive basis- 35 years ago.

What was the first thing you ever built? I helped my father (who was a builder/remodeler) build a two level deck on a lake home when I was 14 (53 years ago).

We want to get to know you, please tell us a little about your business: I am a small, self-owned business professional. My daughter works with me every day (she is a fine carpenter) as well as my middle son (on a part-time basis). I have a strong background in outdoor living – pools & spas / specialty concrete and hardscapes, and I love the creativity of designing and then building what I have designed. Award-winner “Qualified Remodeler” magazine, and several other awards including “Best of Houzz.”
We are a TREX-Pro-Platinum contractor. BBB – A+ rated. We don’t have crews….we are the crew. Fully licensed & insured. Community oriented – contributed labor to several “Habitat for Humanity” homes through the Home Builders of Western Michigan and have built several ramps for veterans.

How do you define success? Success can be defined in several ways: 1) If you love what you do; 2) If you love who you work with: 3) If your customers become your friends and you satisfy them beyond their expectations; 4) If you have been able to weather the economic instability over the past 20 years; 5) If you are recognized by your peers in the industry that you work in.

What advice would you like to share with fellow members that you have learned in your career? Be open to listen to others – you can learn something new every day if you are just willing to listen. Also, be humble – don’t be the “know everything” person in the room…. because you don’t. Always be open to sharing ideas.

What would you do for a career if you weren’t doing this? Cooking is my hobby. I love to cook (My wife is a great cook, but I do 90% of the cooking in our home). I would have a small specialty eatery/café offering specialty salads and sandwiches (made to order right in front of the customer) and unique soups.

A little more about Barry: My family is the most important aspect of my life! I used to be a “workaholic” back in the late 70’s / early 80’s. After my mother passed away and my children were growing, I decided that I needed to focus my energy on them and not on just chasing the money. I would rather have my wife and children see me as a role model that they can look up to than an “absentee” dad that was never home because of work and chasing the almighty dollar. At a time when most people my age are retired (I’m on Social Security), I am out in the field every day with my best friends (my daughter and my son) working side-by-side doing what I love.
My wife and I have been together for 46 years and enjoy spending time together in our first (and only) home. We love spending time outdoors (why not? I work there) enjoying our kids and grandchildren around the pool…..life couldn’t get any better!!!

Website:  Kalamazoodecksandmore.com 

NADRA Member Spotlight

Company Name: Holloway Company
Member Name:   Ted Tidmore
Company Name: Holloway Company
Position:  Owner
Member Category:  Builder
Location:  Sterling, VA
What inspired you to join NADRA? We have a passion for designing and creating unique decks and integrating them into an overall outdoor oasis. We are well-known in our area for custom projects.
When did you first get involved with this industry?  1994
What was the first thing you ever built?  Patio with a small retaining wall and some landscaping. I always had a vision of doing what I’m doing now with outdoor projects.
We want to get to know you, please tell us a little about your business:   I started this company in 1994. I began mowing lawns, then added patios, and then small, basic carpentry items. I am now building large, custom and unique projects. Our specialty is custom, one-of-a-kind projects including hardscaping, carpentry, pools, and more.  We build approx. 50 decks per year.
 
How do you define success?  When the client sees their project come to life and it’s even more than they could have imagined. I am fortunate to have long-standing and loyal staff who are a large part of our success.
What advice would you like to share with fellow members that you have learned in your career?  Be selective in accepting new clients. Taking on new and exciting projects and integrating the industry’s latest innovations is what will continue to put you ahead.
If you could ask your fellow industry professionals one question, what might it be? What is the biggest obstacle you face in continued growth?
What would you do for a career if you weren’t doing this?   Ski instructor in Colorado
A little more about Ted:  I have 4 children, three dogs and a wonderful wife. We enjoy spending time together attending football games, camping, and skiing.

Connect with Holloway Company:

 Website:  HollowayCompany.com

Facebook:  Facebook.com/HollowayCompany/

*A Member Spotlight winner will be chosen each month. For a chance to win, please fill out the questionnaire found  here .

Member Spotlight: Bill Zinnert, Diamond Decks

Member Name: Bill Zinnert

Company Name: Diamond Decks

Position: Owner

Member Category: Builder

Location: Severn, MD

When did you first get involved with this industry? 24 years ago

What inspired you to join NADRA?  Been a member for many years, and always look for marketing opportunities

What was the first thing you ever built? A fence at my first house

We want to get to know you, please tell us a little about your business: Diamond Decks has been operating as a deck builder for 24 years now. In 2008 we decided to make a change in the way the business is structured, and decided to narrow our focus to just Decks, Screened Porches, and some patios.

We are constantly refining our best practices to give our customers the best deck they can have.

In 2016, Diamond Decks was in the top 25 contractors in the nation, for sales of Fiberon Decking. We were actually #14 in the nation. We earned an all inclusive paid vacation to St Thomas along with the other top contractors, from Fiberon and the trip was awesome. It was nice feeling, to be recognized by a leading deck board manufacturer.

We were also one of the first deck builders to earn the “Master Deck Professional” certification through NADRA, and sent our field supervisor Dave Ross, through the class at the deck expo, to become certified.

New for 2017- Diamond decks is now a dealer for Equinox louvered roofs and we will be marketing them soon

How do you define success? Success does not necessarily have anything to do with your volume of sales, and the money you make. I believe it has more to do with being able to put together a solid team of people who work together to help other people out, and also being looked up to as someone they can count on to give them the honest truth.

What advice would you like to share with fellow members that you have learned in your career? You get more out of business, when you stop chasing that dollar, and do something that you are passionate about. The money will come.

What would you do for a career if you weren’t doing this? Probably a building inspector? or do some kind of deck design consulting, if there is a thing like that? or maybe a rock and roll star!

A little more about Bill:  Hobbies…….. If I am not working on something that has to do with business, which I actually like to do, I would be doing something with music. I play in a band, and if I am not playing somewhere, I am going to support my friends in a number of other bands, and sometimes sit in with them for a few songs.

Or visiting with friend somewhere, usually in Fenwick Del / Ocean City Md – Or having a live band and a party at my house
You can see the music theme……. My wife also goes to all my shows, and supports me in everything I do.

We have two kids 29 & 25. Our son, the oldest is an IT guy and is awesome at doing that, and our daughter is now a practicing Doctor of physical therapy. The good news is, they will both being moving out of the house in the next month. SWEET!!!!

We hope there is another NADRA cook out this year, we had a great time last year

Connect with Diamond Decks online:

www.diamonddecksmd.com
Facebook: DiamondDecksMD

Member Spotlight: Robert Lascelle, MyDeck.com

NADRA Member Spotlight.
January 2017 Member Spotlight: Robert Lascelle, MyDeck.com

NADRA launched a member spotlight award for 2017. We are excited to showcase our first winner of 2017, Robert Lascelle from MyDeck.com.
Member Name:  Robert Lascelle
Company Name:  MyDeck.com
Member Category:  Deck Builder
Location:  Flemington, New Jersey
What inspired you to join NADRA?   Lainie chased me down for a long time and finally beat me down until I had to attend a meeting. So glad she did! NADRA has helped my business grow and I have lifelong friends within the organization.

What was the first thing you ever built?  It Was a deck of course, it was a pressure-treated deck in Pittstown, New Jerse y.
How do you define success?  I define success in business as the joy you feel from your work and also the joy you feel from your clients after a project is complete.

What advice would you like to share with fellow members that you have learned in your career?
Work on your business and not in it.

If you could ask your fellow industry professionals one question, what might it be? 

What single action have you done that has brought you the most success?
What would you do for a career if you weren’t doing this?
I would be a Sandyhook Harbor Pilot. I would have been one if I had not started my business at such an early age.
Tell us anything! Talk about your family, pets, travel, hobbies… I have an incredibly beautiful wife that has many skill sets including being a wonderful mother to my daughter Brooklyn and my stepson Cory. Brooklyn is 10 years old and enjoys gymnastics and animals. Cory just turned 18 and is heading into the Marines July 10, 2017.
My wife is a heavy equipment operator as her main job, she also performs autopsies at Hunterdon Medical Center. Lastly, she became a Hunterdon County  death investigator last year. I spend most of my time running my business and trying to be as good of a dad as I can to my children. I love being on the water and have two Jetski’s and purchased the boat of my dreams last year. I plan on taking the entire month of July off this summer to spend a lot of quality time on it with my family.
*A Member Spotlight winner will be chosen each month. For a chance to win, please fill out the questionnaire found here