NADRA Code Update

May 8th, 2019

Notes from NADRA’s Code Committee Chair, Mark Guthrie:

Building codes are always going to play a critical part in the safety, growth and public perception of our industry.  NADRA recognizes this and has been dedicating an increasing amount of time and resources to better understanding and shaping the codes that we all must build to and live by.   A big part of this is our preparation and attendance at the ICC Code Hearings.

Last week, I attended the hearings along with our Technical Advisor Glenn Mathewson.  We spoke on behalf of NADRA, both “for” and “against” code proposals that have the potential to impact our future. In most cases, we were able to gain the support of the voting committee on the codes that we felt best represented the position of NADRA – safer decks built to reasonable, fact-based standards of construction.  

Other than the individual code items that we spoke to, the biggest win in my mind was that NADRA came away from this meeting as a more recognized and respected voice in a room full of the most influential and credentialed building industry professionals.  Glenn was well prepared to state our case supported by facts and passion on our behalf and it was recognized.

What follows are Glenn’s notes on the meetings.  It’s a great rundown of what we can look forward to in future codes and how to shape it with your help.  It’s well worth the read.

Update from Glenn Mathewson:

Last week, I had the honor of attending and speaking on behalf of NADRA at the International Code Council Committee Action Hearing for the creation of the 2021 International Residential Code.  

These hearings ran from 8am to 7pm, with every code topic imaginable being scrutinized, debated and voted on throughout the week.  Deck-specific proposals were scattered between more general ones. Keep in mind that many features inside a home, like stairs for instance, are also an important part of decks.  However, many proponents of change don’t necessarily realize how their proposals may impact our industry. I was there to consider and react to these, ready to defend the interests of our membership while still focusing on the deck related changes we had prepared for.

The code hearing process can be a little confusing but worth a quick explanation.  A volunteer committee of varied professionals at this stage considered testimony for and against the more than 300 modification proposals.   Their majority vote for approval or disapproval then set in motion the next phase where the public can submit changes to these proposals. All proposals that receive a public comment for modification will be deliberated again in the Final Action Hearings in October like last week’s meeting.  However, this time the final vote will be made by governmental ICC members made up mostly of local code officials from around the country.

There is still more work that needs to be done whether you agreed or disagreed with the votes taken last week.  A modification to a proposal that was approved by the committee only now requires a majority vote to become 2021 code.  To turn over a committee disapproval takes a 2/3rd majority. So, if you don’t agree with the committees vote this time, you better submit a public comment to help sway sentiment at the final hearings.  

Here is a rundown of the more significant deck-related proposals and what the committee felt about them:

RB46 & RB47 were the work of many in trying to separate guards and handrails into their own rows in the minimum live load table, and to better identify the loading direction that must be resisted.  Currently both must resist loads in all possible directions. Argument was delivered that a guard is for fall protection off an elevated floor surface and thus should not be required to be designed to support the same loads pulling back in toward the deck as those pushing out over the edge.  The committee disagreed and this one was a half win. Handrails and guards were split on the table, but the loading direction was unchanged. This is still a good first step that will allow future work to better identify the loads they must each resist.

RB50 was a serious proposal suggesting that all decks be built to a minimum 60 psf live load, rather than the current 40 psf.  However, to achieve this, the proposal required a using the 70 psf snow load tables in a different proposal by NADRA and the Deck Code Coalition (DCC).  Luckily, after much deliberation, the committee decided this was not appropriate and the proposal was disapproved. After the decision, I reached out to the proponent and invited them to discuss their concerns in deck live loads with us.  There are many with ideas and experience in decks and they cannot be dismissed. NADRA stands by collaboration as the only way to appropriately develop the future codes of our industry.

RB106 suggested a strict method of constructing stairs, including stringer cuts, spans and spacing, securing to a concrete landing, and details for connecting the stairs at the top.  The proposal is not a surprise, as the absence structural code provisions for how to build stairs is well known. However, the suggestions in RB106 just didn’t represent very much flexibility and needed more work.  We spoke against this proposal and it was disapproved.

There were many other proposals with minor impacts that we spoke to in support and opposition, and in nearly all cases the committee voted in the manner we had hoped.  On the last full day of testimony, the proposals that NADRA and the DCC have spent months developing were heard.

RB184 was our largest proposal and offered new design tables for sizing deck structural members.  The new tables expanded the current 40 psf live load to 50, 60 and 70 psf snow loads options.  This would allow many more regions to use the prescriptive design method in the IRC. This proposal also included critical alterations to the footing table, such as reducing the minimum 14-inch diameter pier currently in the IRC to as small as 8-inch diameter for small decks and stair landings.  It also expanded the post-sizing table to include the actual area of the deck supported and various wood species. Unfortunately, some last minute engineering tweaks had to be made to the table that was submitted and the committee didn’t feel they had sufficient time to review them. They disapproved it.  Luckily, there were no negative statements made in committee discussions and no opposition testimony. The committee encouraged us to submit the revisions as public comment so they can be thoroughly reviewed. Other attendees at the hearing, not affiliated with the DCC, stood and spoke in favor of our proposal.  There is still hope for a strong vote of approval in the Final Action Hearings.

RB185 was the most collaborated proposal of all from the DCC, as it was related to guard post installation.  Working with the many parties in the DCC, there have always been very differing opinions about how specific guard construction should be detailed in the IRC.  After much argument, disagreement, and sharing of knowledge, the members of the DCC were able to respect each other and all agree on a minimum proposal to make a step forward in safer guard construction.  We agreed to prohibit the notching of 4×4 posts and to include code language requiring a post to be secured into the adjacent framing of the deck, not just the single rim board. However, no specific hardware was specified, keeping the code generic and flexible.  The committee congratulated us a number of times for the professional manner in which we worked together. The proposal was approved.

RB187 was a pretty simple proposal to make better sense of various deck foundation types, minimum depths, and frost depth exceptions.  With the committee approval of this proposal, the code will be better presented. One clarification made was that decks attached to non-frost-protected structures, such as detached garages or sheds, will not have to themselves be frost protected.

RB190 is a proposal that makes beam design for decks much more flexible.  The current table in the IRC for sizing beams is based on the span of the joist supported by the beam, but it assumes those joists are at their maximum allowable cantilever beyond the beam.  For decks with flush beams and no cantilevered joists, the maximum beam span is incredibly conservative. We proposed a footnote modification method that will allow the table to be more flexible and alter the values based on the lesser amount of cantilever.  The example used in the proposal showed how a beam without cantilevered joists was still being limited to a maximum 7 foot 4 inches, but with our new footnote modification would actually be able to span 9 feet. The committee agreed that this was a much-needed flexibility to the table and approved our proposal.

RB 191 is a proposal based in truth, though it may not be something deck builders will be thrilled about.  None-the-less, our reputation as contributors to the code development process must remain grounded in what is most appropriate for the industry.  The maximum joists spacing of different thicknesses of wood decking is derived from an analysis method that assumes each board is spanning at least two joist bays, bearing on three joists.  This is not currently explained in the code. The provisions we proposed maintained the maximum joists spacing for decking supported on at least three joists, but reduced the maximum spacing for decking supported by only two joists.  For these short lengths, the maximum joist spacing will be approximately half. Revealing this oversight in the code maintains a high level of professionalism in our industry, yet also allowed us to craft the code in a manner that provides more assurance for sound construction, while also allowing for design freedom..

RB302 was our final proposal and it was related to the guard design collaboration.  To address concerns of building departments that have no way to approve simple, basic guard designs while not hindering the professional builders from unique guard designs, a new appendix chapter was proposed.  IRC appendix chapters must be adopted individually by a jurisdiction and are not automatically part of the mandatory code. Where not adopted, they can still be referenced as an approved manner for construction.  The proposal included specific methods for attaching guard posts that have been engineered to support the 200 lb. required design load. Assuming the committee would agree that guards don’t need to support a 200 lb. inward load, that load was not specifically addressed.  Unfortunately, that assumption was incorrect, and the committee did not approve the appendix proposal.

Overall, the contributions of NADRA and the DCC were an overwhelming success.  Our voice was heard, respected, and made a difference. It’s a voice that we can’t allow to ever go silent.  The IRC will be modified every three years, as will the IBC and the swimming pool and spa code (ISPSC), both of which have implications on decks.  There will always be a need for the deck industry to stand and speak. We have made a great impression, but there is still much work to be done to complete the 2021 IRC.

Congratulations to us all on this success,

Glenn Mathewson, MCP – NADRA Technical Advisor.

NADRA Code Update

February 2019

By Glenn Mathewson

Thanks to the support of NADRA members we have shared our knowledge with others in the campfire discussions regarding deck code proposals for the 2021 International Residential Code.  There were 9 proposals submitted with our assistance and approval. The Deck Code Coalition is an informal group of generous professionals from a variety of backgrounds. Led by the steadfast efforts of Mr. Charles Banjai, a now retired code official and long-time contributor to code development, NADRA was able to work with these professionals toward well-developed deck codes.   While some disagreement remains and some is yet to be decided, it appears the majority of these proposals have broad support. Here is a brief rundown of what was submitted.

  1. Decking spans for single-span and two-span conditions.
  2. Ledger, joist, and beam design tables up to 50, 60 & 70 psf snow loads.
  3. Beam cantilever wording corrected.  Mostly clerical.
  4. Relocation of footing depth and frost protection provisions.  Mostly clerical, so interpretation can be more consistent and understood.
  5. Separates guards and handrails on the load table so future, more appropriate, minimum design loads can be determined for each independently.
  6. Provisions requiring guard post attachment to be secured to adjacent members in the deck framing.  Sets minimum guard post at 4×4 and with no notches permitted.
  7. Clarifies that multi-ply beams must be fastened together.
  8. An adjustment factor to allow longer beam spans when the joists do not cantilever beyond the beam and for various distances of cantilever.  This will allow more flexible use of the beam span table.
  9. Add an appendix for guard post connection details and for future provisions regarding specific deck designs.

While this milestone in the code development process is exciting, it’s just the beginning.  Anyone can submit a proposal and there are plenty of people interested in decks. Here are the next steps:

  1. On March 4th ICC will publish all of the proposed changes.  Previous years leave expectations at well over a thousand pages of proposals to review for deck-related provisions.  
  2. Once identified, the membership will need to decide. What’s good, what needs work, what is dangerous?
  3. Research and communication with others follows.  
  4. Then reaching out to the proponents of topics of concern to share and discuss, in hopes that agreement and compromise for better code can be achieved before the hearing.  
  5. Before the Albuquerque hearings this May, testimony has to be prepared in hope as the winning words for the committee.
  6. After these preparations, the hearing will commence and it will end, and the committee results will be published.  
  7. Next, all the research and networking will happen again as public comments are prepared and submitted.
  8. This is only to be followed by all the public comments being published and the review of all the surprises will begin again.
  9. Finally, all will conclude at the final hearings in October 2019.

If you are in the decking industry, we need your help.  The ideas are being discussed and the rules are being made.  You shouldn’t stand on the sidelines any longer. We need you in the game. There are two ways you can help in a big way.

1. Offer your time: To volunteer time, please email Info@NADRA.org and we will work with you and the code committee to see how we can best utilize your skills – most likely, helping to review the proposals in March.

2. Offer your monetary support: To contribute to the fundraising initiative, follow this link here to see what our goal and how the funds are being used to keep this effort moving forward. 

NADRA Code Update

Here’s a run down of proposals likely to be submitted Jan. 7th with the combined support of nearly all the contributors of the Deck Code Coalition.  I am proud of NADRA for being a part of this support.

By Glenn Mathewson

At the annual meeting in October, it was announced that I was prepared to work for NADRA and the decking industry to represent them in the development of the 2021 International Residential Code.  I know it’s hard for most to wrap their heads around the idea of changing the 2018 code already, considering it doesn’t even have widespread adoption yet. That’s why you’ve hired me, and I’ve already gotten to work.  The best place to begin that work was to contribute to the Deck Code Coalition, an unofficial coalition of the most powerful interests in deck code. Organizations such as the NAHB, SMA and AWC are involved. Code officials from multiple ICC chapters, product manufacturers, engineering firms, and many other professionals from various backgrounds are also there.  Where is there? It’s an imaginary campfire with all interests sitting around together, sharing, talking, contributing, arguing at times, but yet no one has been thrown in the fire. This is how code should be developed, with the overall interest being the people…the end user. I believe the efforts thus far, thanks to those members that have financially contributed, have been more successful than I expected.  

Here’s a run down of proposals likely to be submitted Jan. 7th with the combined support of nearly all the contributors of the Deck Code Coalition.  I am proud of NADRA for being a part of this support.

Are you shocked by the new minimum14-inch diameter footing/pier required in the 2018 IRC?  If you haven’t heard, even the four footings under that small stair landing must be 14 inch.  We expressed our concerns of this to the DCC and the American Wood Council (AWC) agreed and re-engineered new minimum footing diameters for the table.   How does a minimum 8-inch diameter sound for those little landing? Well, that’s what is being proposed and supported by the DCC. Had NADRA not expressed our concerns, no one was going to address it.  The AWC deserves a big thank you for their engineering work.

The new beam, joist and post sizing tables first included in the 2015 IRC only handled regions with up to a 40 psf snow load.  Through significant effort from the AWC, new larger tables have been engineered to handle snow loads of 50, 60 , and 70 psf. This new code, if included in the IRC, won’t help out for all regions, but for the snowier regions that were left with nothing but job-specific engineering, this provides a much more affordable design option.

Poorly written code is hard to understand, makes the industry it addresses look ignorant, and lends itself to inconsistent interpretation.  Changes to the exceptions for footing sizes and frost protection were left pretty messy in the 2018 IRC. A proposal that reorganizes those provisions will make the code much easier to read and understand.  While this may not seem like a big deal to many, rest assured, it’s worthwhile work.

Guards and handrails are like peanut butter and jelly, they are completely different, but often end up in the same sandwich.  Guards along stairs may include a handrail feature at the top, or they may support a handrail at the side, but serve a different function and must resist different loads and load directions.  The IRC has always lumped these two features together in the load table that specifies the load and load directions they must resist. With recent testing and validation for guard strength, manufacturers and others have published many details for how to build guards.  NADRA has long stood that before work is done to design guards to resist the code-specified minimum loads, those loads should be re-evaluated. In my research of minimum guard loading over the last 5 decades, it’s clear to see that the target loads have been a “best guess”.  After attending a meeting with the American Society of Civil Engineers (the authority on design loads) and supporting efforts by the NAHB, we are proud that a proposal to separate guards and handrails in the load table and address the direction of loading for guards more specifically will be submitted by the DCC in January.

On the same subject of guard loading, we have worked diligently to help other interests in deck code understand what we understand about guard design.  It’s creative and unique and that’s what “the people” want. Reputable professionals have a strong motivation to see a specific guard post connection detail illustration with proprietary hardware devices in the pages of the IRC.  The intent is good natured and understandable. Inspectors have long had nothing but a push on guards as their measure of code compliance (safety), and that can leave anyone with that responsibility a little uneasy. They too see the news of the failing decks across our country.  This is respectable and understandable. However, builders are equally uneasy about another “picture” being put in the code that appears to universally require proprietary hardware and a specific method for post attachment. Remember the lateral load anchor? How can you forget? It’s false flag and illusion of a complete lateral load design have forever changed the industry, and still today, 10 years later, it’s only “permitted” not “required”.  A picture is worth a thousand words, and for many inspectors there’s no need to read the permissive words if the seemingly required picture is there. We can’t see this happen to guards the same way it happened to ledgers.

The will to address poorly built deck guards in the IRC is strong and has made two attempts at guard structural design code in the last two editions.  To do this work respectably, no one should have everything their way. While NADRA has incredible experience with boots on the ground, we don’t know it all.  If we appreciate the experience from other professionals when we agree, then we must also respect their experiences when we disagree. With this humble philosophy comes respectable code.  Code that was carried to the hearings in many loving arms is far greater than code pushed in with singular, selfish power. Compromise has to be made by all, so NADRA took the first step. To respect the concerns of others and hope they return it with respect for ours, we entertained new code language to prohibit some of the notoriously insufficient guard designs.  Minimum 4×4 posts for guards will eliminate some shoddy 2×4 posts that can be found. Notching of 4×4 posts in guard construction has been done for all of time, and though it works in some rare cases, it generally does not. Research has been done on this subject, and the proof is pretty clear. To help show our willingness to address this common mode of guard failure, NADRA has thus far agreed to support a prohibition of notching 4×4 guard posts.  Other proposed code language includes clear instruction that the guard posts must be secured to adjacent joists and transfer the loads into the whole deck, not just the rim joist. We were careful this language didn’t specify “blocking” that could interfere with deck drainage systems. We also made sure to exclude any mention of proprietary hardware.

It was our hope that by taking the first step to compromise and draft code language to address guard safety we would encourage others of the same teamwork and they would withdrawal their proposal for a “picture”.  Unfortunately…we were unsuccessful. Though the DCC was able to agree on 6 proposals, including the one we compromised in, select members have announced they will still propose the “picture” and we must battle it out at the hearings.  To say I’m disappointed is an understatement, and to say I didn’t lose a little respect for those professionals would be a lie. The code must represent all professional experiences and be the best mix of them all. Period. The professionals contributing to the DCC bring enough experience and spent enough time sharing it together, that any proposal that could not be agreed upon by all, is a proposal unfit for the hearing and for the code.  Period. No exceptions. In bringing the voice of the decking industry to the code development process, we must do it with as much respect and understanding as possible, and we can only hope to receive it in return. Alas, NADRA will need to take that message to the hearing and be sure the attendance knows that the guard picture proposed next year is lacking the support of many professionals.

Now for the bad news… Helping with these 6 proposals is only a slice of the work to be done.  They are simply the proposals we could contribute to before the hearings. On January 7th of next year, thousands of pages of proposals will be submitted and they will likely contain many deck-related proposals we have yet to know anything about.  NADRA must be prepared to comb through these proposals when they are published in March. I’ve heard some rumors of two proposals to expect. One to require the same additional load on deck boards that stair treads must resist.  Notice how with most plastic composite lumber you can’t span as far on stair treads as you can for deck boards? A max 16-inch span for decking is often reduced to 12 inches on stairs, but not if that proposal wins. Of course every single max span you have come to know could change with this next one.  A proposal from a powerful proponent is likely to be submitted, one that would raise the minimum design live load of 40 psf to 60 psf, but just for decks. Not the floor inside the house.

Did you hear those last two?  Ready to change all your design norms?  Ready to retest all your manufactured decking?  Are you ready for singular powers that don’t manufacture, sell, or build decks to tell you how to do it? When was the last time you had a deck built to 40 psf collapse under load? Not due to some construction flaw.

These last few months of 2018 have proven the necessity for NADRA to have funding to represent the industry in code, but the work has hardly begun. Much is still needed of the membership if NADRA is to continue contributing to this work. Your help is needed.

To support NADRA’s important Code initiative, please visit and share our code fundraising page and consider contributing today. 

Thank you for your support! 

Couple injured when deck collapses at Des Moines home

It’s Important to Check Your Deck®

Authorities say a man and woman were injured when their elevated deck collapsed at their home in northeast Des Moines while they were grilling food.

The Des Moines Register reports the incident occurred just after 5 p.m. Monday. Des Moines Police Sgt. Tina Kalar says rotted wood may have allowed the deck to fall away from the house.

The 72-year-old woman was taken to a hospital for treatment of burns from the grill’s contents. Her 69-year-old husband was treated at an urgent care center.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Read the original article here

NADRA reminds homeowners to Check Your Deck®

“Your roof has a life expectancy. Your windows have a life expectancy. What about your deck?” Says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of NADRA.  Just like other products exposed to the environment, over time your deck will need to be replaced. Asphalt shingles have a life expectancy of about 20 years*.  Aluminum and vinyl windows are expected to last 15-20 years*. Beaudry continues… “With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired.”  It’s important for homeowners to check their deck on a yearly basis.

NADRA is working diligently with ASHI, The American Society of Home Inspectors, as well as, AIBD, The American Institute of Building Design. The associations are working towards educating and certifying thousands of industry professionals to meet the need for inspecting the millions of decks that are past their useful life. Homeowners can search for qualified inspectors at www.NADRA.org.

About NADRA:

The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of  deck buildersinspectorsmanufacturers, dealers/distributors, lumberyards, wholesalers, retailers, and service providers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. Visit www.NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources.

*Source: National Association of HomeBuilders/Bank of America Home Equity, Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components 2/07.

© Copyright 2018 North American Deck and Railing Association. All rights reserved.

###

Composite Decking and Railing Industry Research Report

Exclusive Offer From NADRA

During the four months of 2018, Spectrum Consulting conducted research with the objective of providing clients with an extensive research report and overview of the composite decking and railing industry. The  information provided in the report details industry research from a
variety of sources including in-depth interviews with leading distributors, suppliers and dealers.

DOWNLOAD THE ORDER FORM NOW

Marketplace overview:
Size and growth of the market 2017/2016
2018 forecast
Consumer trends
Decking overview
Market Segments in dollars sales
Estimated industry sales by region
Railing overview (product types and trends)
Growth of the composite market in relation to Treated Lumber
Treated Lumber code change overview

Industry Supplier overview
Market share estimates by supplier
Market place profile of the top three suppliers
Overview of second tier suppliers
The marketplace impact of contractor loyalty programs, distributor and dealer rebates
Challenges and opportunities for suppliers not among the top three

Status of the two-step distributor marketplace
Key issue results from major distributor interviews
Distributor views of the decking and railing product category
Dealer brand loyalty
Distributor consolidation

The home center marketplace and its impact on the industry
Home center overview (Home Depot, Lowe’s, Menards)
The impact and implications of Home Center online sales and home site deliveries
The potential for Home Centers to grow sales at the expense of traditional lumberyards

DOWNLOAD THE ORDER FORM NOW

Deck Safety Marketing Resources now Available to Help Outdoor Living Industry Boost Business this Spring

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Michael Beaudry

Phone: 215-679-4884

Email: Info@NADRA.org


In honor of Deck Safety Month®, the North American Decking and Railing Association reminds professionals to take advantage of exclusive deck safety marketing resources along with press release templates, graphics, ads, social media content, flyers, and more.

Quakertown, PA – “With more than 50 million decks in the U.S., it is estimated that 25 million decks are past their useful life and need to be replaced or repaired.” Says Michael Beaudry, executive vice president of NADRA. This means big business opportunities for deck builders, remodelers, inspectors and contractors to promote deck inspections, ensuring homeowner safety while simultaneously building their own brand.

The North American Decking and Railing Association (NADRA) offers industry professionals and inspectors a breadth of resources, including a comprehensive toolkit, marketing materials, and inspection checklists.

“May is Deck Safety Month®-along with prime outdoor living season-and that presents a perfect chance for savvy pros to market their business,” says Beaudry.

The non-profit trade association offers the following resources for building professionals to leverage during Deck Safety Month® and throughout the year, including:

  • The 2018 official deck safety toolkit. This NADRA-member benefit includes:
    • Deck Safety Month® Logo
    • Check Your Deck® Logo
    • 2018 Deck Safety Ambassador Logo (for official ambassadors only) learn more here about the ambassador program
    • 10-point consumer checklist
    • Link to online deck inspection form
    • Social media content for your use
    • Customizable press release templates
    • Customizable flyer all about deck safety
    • Customizable social media, infographics, and web graphics
    • Tips and guidelines to make the most out of Deck Safety Month®
  • Deck Evaluation Form: A step-by-step guide to evaluating the integrity of the deck structure, stairs, surface, and railings. A downloadable form and online form (BETA) are available to members and non-members.
  • Certified inspector program: NADRA is working diligently with ASHI, The American Society of Home Inspectors, as well as, AIBD, The American Institute of Building Design. The associations are working towards educating and certifying thousands of industry professionals to meet the need for inspecting the millions of decks that are past their useful life. Classes are available for scheduling.
  • Deck Safety Ambassadors: Help spread the word about deck safety by becoming a Deck Safety Ambassador. Sponsors gain access to an exclusive Ambassador logo and marketing benefits to further promote their businesses.
  • Homeowner resources: Builders can download the 10-Point Deck Safety Consumer Checklist to pass along to customers. Though not a replacement for a professional deck inspection, the checklist can assist homeowners and provide reference during other times of the year.

“Communicating safe decking standards remains a top priority for NADRA,” Beaudry says. “We continue to focus our efforts on educating both pros and consumers on proper deck installation practices as well as on consistent deck inspections. At the same time, we know that deck safety offers professionals in the industry a great opportunity to market their business, so we’ve provided all of the tools to help them do just that.”


About NADRA:

The North American Decking and Railing Association is the voice of the decking industry, representing the interests of  deck builders, inspectors, manufacturers, dealers/distributors, lumberyards, wholesalers, retailers, and service providers alike. NADRA’s mission is to provide a unified source for the professional development, promotion, growth, and sustenance of the deck and railing building industry in North America so that members can exceed the expectations of their customers. Visit www.NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources.

Visit www.NADRA.org to access all of NADRA’s Deck Safety Month® resources for industry professionals. *You must be a current NADRA member to access the “toolkit”. Join NADRA today.

© Copyright 2018 North American Deck and Railing Association. All rights reserved.

###

Deck for a Soldier® Build – New Jersey UPDATE

January 24th, 2017 UPDATE & Thank You:

Dear NADRA Members and Supporters,

I am extremely pleased to let everyone know that the Northeast Regions Deck for a Soldier® build went very smoothly and was completed in four days.  The build started on Monday, January 16th, 2017 with a crew from three separate builder member companies. We installed the Trex Elevations steel framing, along with the help from several Trex and distributor representatives.  Tuesday was supposed to be a wash-out of a rainy day, but several of us gathered, installed the stairway platform and cut all of the stair stringers.  Wednesday, we had crews from four builder members and we installed the decking, stairways, some fascia trim and the Andersen sliding door.  We also had representatives from Fortress Railings, Fiberon, and AZEK helping out.  Thursday, we had two crews, plus representatives from Trex, Wolf Home Products, Fortress Railings and Excelsior Lumber, Inc. that helped install the last of the fascia trim and the railings.  We were lucky enough to have spiked the interest of a local newspaper and also the TV station News 12, New Jersey. We also received coverage from The Daily Record, you can read more & see photos / video here.

Our Soldier was extremely thankful and really could not believe that a program like ours exists.  He was overwhelmed when wheeled out on the deck for the first time and was able to look around his neighborhood.  Kyle added: “The Deck for a Soldier® program has been top notch. Really great crew. I couldn’t even imagine something like this existed where people are just giving away decks for people but it does,” Chappell says.

I would like to thank, from the bottom of my heart, everyone involved in this project for their time and materials.  Many gave so freely to this project that it was inspiring to all.  I continuously heard the following words, “Whatever you need for this project, just let us know”.  We certainly could not have gotten this project done without the support of the best team in the decking industry.  NADRA Rocks!!

Respectfully,

Bruce Verblaauw

NADRA National Deck For A Soldier Committee – Chair Person

Listed below are all of the companies and individuals who donated their time and materials:

Material Donations:

–        Trex Decking & Steel Framing

–        Fortress Railings

–        FastenMaster

–        Simpson Strong Tie

–        Starborn Industries

–        Eastern Engineered Wood Products

–        Excelsior Lumber

–        Abbe Lumber

–        Fox Lumber

–        Zuidema Portable Toilets

–        Boonton Township

–        Jeff Fleischer, Architect

–        Lunch was provided by Trex, CPG/AZEK, Fiberon and the Soldier’s mom

Labor Donations

–        C. Verblaauw & Sons, LLC
Bruce Verblaauw

Scott Olson

Melissa Olson

Tommy DeLuise

Miguel Dominguez

Jose Santos

Neal Moran

–        My Deck

Ed Drake

Ben Sherman

–        Barrett Outdoors

Gustavo deLaCruz

–        Deck Remodelers

Chuck Briggs

Cory Bohner

–        Legends Built

Bill Lecorchik

–        All American Decks

Scott Nadrotowski

Robbie Sciacchetano

Steve Daum

–        North Jersey Custom Decks

Joe Onorevole

Mark Onorevole

John

–        Decks by Kiefer

Bob Kiefer & Helper

–        Trex

Butch Palaza

Tim Schlosser

Mike Ryan

Laura Hays

Jamie Binns

Tim Van Vaketis

–        Manufacturers Reserve Supply

Chris Christakis

Peter King

Weiss Froogh

Sean O’Brien

Jared Noble

–        FastenMaster

Josh Hall

–        Fortress Railing

Craig Dowdy

–        Fiberon

Lainie Sleppin

–        CPG/AZEK

Alan Bensen

Drew Giganti

Kyle McEnroe

–        Wolf Home Products

Paul Kovach

–        Excelsior Lumber

Sophia Bishop

Adam Spratt

–        Mid-State Lumber

Pete Miller

January 18th, 2017 UPDATE:

Hi NADRA!
Well, everything has fallen into place and we were able to start our Deck for a Soldier® build in Boonton Twsp., NJ on January 16th!  The Township has waived the permit fees except for the DCA fee.  We’ve had a local builder member offer to help out and dig the footing holes on Saturday 1/7/17.
We had a footing inspection on 1/11/17 and we completed the pour right after that along with the bottom of the stairway landing. We have several builders lined up to help out with this build for the four days that we anticipate the build to take, but we can always use more.  If anyone else wishes to help out please go online to fill out a pledge form found  here, or contact Bruce V. at  BruceVerb@njdecksandrailings.com.
Thanks to our awesome manufacturers, distributors and lumberyards, all of the necessary materials have been donated.  Be on the lookout for pictures and more on NADRA’s Facebook pageLike us on Facebook
Sincerely,
Bruce Verblaauw NADRA National – Deck for a Soldier ® Committee Chair
Cell  201-803-2909

Before

During

During

Final

January 4th, 2017 UPDATE: 

We want to start out by wishing everyone a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year!!

We just wanted to let everyone know that we will be starting the Deck for a Soldier® build in Boonton, NJ on January 16th, weather permitting.  This project is located a little way off of Route 287 about 10 minutes north of Morristown, NJ.  This deck will be built using Trex Elevations Steel Framing, so if any of you would like to learn some of the ins and outs of working with this product, please let us know so we can schedule you to volunteer to frame.  Of course we will need help for about 4 days in order to complete this build and help tying up loose end to finish is always needed.  If you have already filled out a labor pledge, please let us know what day(s) that week work best for you or your crew.  We are also hoping to dig and pour the 10 footings required for this deck either late next week or very early the following week so that the concrete has time to cure before we start building.  We would appreciate if we could get a few guys to help dig these footings.  We have some builders but can still use a few more to step up and help out with this build.  If you are interested in helping and have not notified us or completed an online labor pledge, please email us or click on this link We will try to keep a steady flow of help on the project so that we do not have too many workers on any given day.
Thanks to all of our manufacturers, distributors and lumberyards, all of the materials have been accounted for.  The one thing that has not been supplied yet is a Porta-John.
As we hear back from each of you, we will put together a schedule that best fits the needs of the build and will be back in touch with you soon.
Thank you very much for your support and help,
Judy Verblaauw (on behalf of)
Bruce Verblaauw
NADRA National Deck For A Soldier® Committee Chair

 

December 2016 UPDATE: 

With the holidays just around the corner it is the time of year to think about giving in the old fashioned tradition for the holidays, donating to a great local cause and giving back to the community where we make our living.  The NADRA Deck for a Soldier® program is about to kick off it’s Northeastern build on 1/16/17, weather permitting.  We are planning to get a start right after the first of the year and install the footings prior to this build date.  We have almost all of the materials accounted for except for some concrete form tubes, a Porta-John, and some small hardware.  If anyone can help us with these last few things it would be greatly appreciated. Lastly, we can still use a few more builders to step up and help out with the build.  If anyone can donate time to help out on this project please contact us at bruceverb@njdecksandrailings.com.   You can fill out the online form to make your pledge of material, labor or even a monetary pledge for various unexpected expenses right here.

We will start to send out emails in order to figure out who can help on which day in the near future.  This will keep a steady flow to the project and keep from having too many workers on any given day.

Thank you and Happy Holidays to all.

NADRA Deck for a Soldier® Committee Chair,

Bruce Verblaauw

Phone: (201) 327-7864(201) 236-0393

Email: bruceverb@njdecksandrailings.com

BrightClaim Earns National Recognition

NEWS RELEASE

Contact:  Andrew Clements, E mail: andrew.clements@brightclaim.com Office :770-779-0940

  

BrightClaim EARNS NATIONAL RECOGNITION AT LEADING INDUSTRY EVENT

 

Atlanta, GA – 10/19/16.  BrightClaim, a NADRA member based in Atlanta, GA was honored at the recent 2016 National Awards Ceremony with the 2016 Recognition Award, an awards program by The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA).

 

BrightClaim was selected for the 2016 Recognition Award. The award recipients are selected from NADRA members from across the U.S. and Canada.

 

“We are honored to receive a national award from a highly regarded trade association,” Andrew Clements of BrightClaim said “It’s gratifying that peers in the industry found our company worthy of recognition.”

 

“Andy Clements’ support over the years has helped bring together some the greatest technical experts in the industry.  NADRA is positioned to continue its mission in raising the bar of this industry through the efforts of members like Andy Clements.” Said Michael Beaudry of NADRA.

 

It is BrightClaim’s privilege to be a part of the NADRA family.  We are honored to receive a recognition award to assist the decking industry with the Consumer Product Awareness Charter.  The NADRA CPAC program’s goal is to assist consumers, manufactures, resellers, and installers.    It’s a great honor and privilege to assist NADRA help the decking industry. At BrightClaim our goal is to be your third party warranty services resource partner.

 

For more information on BrightClaim Warranty Services, contact Andrew Clements andrew.clements@brightclaim.com

 

# # #

About NADRA     The North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA) is a not-for-profit trade association made up of deck builders, manufacturers, dealers/distributors, wholesalers, retailers, inspectors, and service providers to the deck and railing industry. NADRA emphasizes safe building practices and deck safety. For information, visit www.NADRA.org.

 

About BrightClaim Warranty Services    At BrightClaim Warranty Services, our focus is to provide consistent warranty claims related services such as inspections, managed repair and claims administration that support our client’s needs.  Our involvement allows our clients to focus more on their core business and improve management of expense claims costs. To learn more visit our website http://brightclaim.com/warranty-services/ 

 

WOLF HOME PRODUCTS TO UNVEIL NEW PRODUCTS

N E W S   R E L E A S E

 

DATE:                    September 21, 2016

 

CONTACT:           Jim Groff, Vice President of Marketing, Wolf Home Products 717.852.4842jcgroff@wolforg.net
 

WOLF HOME PRODUCTS TO UNVEIL HISTORIC ROLLOUT OF NEW PRODUCTS AND SERVICES AT 2016 REMODELING SHOW

(YORK, Pa.) —Wolf Home Products today announced it will be introducing the largest single expansion of products and dealer support services in the company’s history at the Remodeling Show/Deck Expo/JLC Live 2016.  Wolf Home Products is a leading supplier of kitchen cabinets and building products in the U.S.

The Remodeling Show, which will run October 5-7 at the Baltimore Convention Center, is a three day event sponsored by the National Association of Homebuilders, the North American Deck and Rail Association and Remodeling magazine featuring educational conference programming, professional development and product exhibition.

Heading the list of Wolf’s new products is Wolf Transition, Wolf Home Products’ new line of full-access cabinets, one of the most sought-after styles of cabinetry on the market. Wolf Transition cabinets present not only simplicity and contemporary style, but also increased storage, easier access and a more efficient use of space. Wolf Transition cabinets will be available in 17 door styles and 37 finishes.

In addition to Transition, the Wolf Home Products exhibit at Booth 2204 will feature:

  • Terrace, Wolf’s brand new decking collection, featuring 5 capped composite decking colors
  • Two new Tropical Hardwood PVC decking colors and two new PVC porch colors
  • Two new door styles to the Builders Mark cabinet line
  • Block-It housewrap from Kimberly-Clark
  • New Boral Siding products
  • A roll-out of Wolf Home Products’ new website, which will offer much greater interactivity, streamlined navigation, and a wide range of fresh content

Visitors to Wolf Home Products’ booth will be among the first to see and handle the new products and talk with the team of Wolf Home Products experts.   For more information, click here for the JLC Live website.

For more information about Wolf Home Products, visit www.wolfhomeproducts.com

#  #   # 

About Wolf Home Products    Wolf Home Products supplies kitchen and bath, outdoor living and building products using its innovative business model. With more than 170 years of experience and a vast inventory of high-quality products, Wolf strives to accurately deliver orders in a fraction of the time to ensure unparalleled satisfaction and value. For more information, go to wolfhomeproducts.com.

Koppers’, Todd Greer talks about AWPA Modifications

It was great to meet and speak directly with NADRA members at the Atlanta meeting. We look forward to working with the organization, and encouraging communication within our industry. Koppers believes it is important to provide a unified source of information for deck building professionals to learn more about the use of treated wood products and technologies.

The main reason for the new Standard change is to address misuse of ABOVE GROUND treated wood products.  ABOVE GROUND treated products shall not be used in ground contact, or subjected to hazards comparable to ground contact. If components such as a deck joist, or support beam are critical to the performance and safety of the system and would be difficult to maintain, repair or replace, then those components shall be treated to GROUND CONTACT Standard. ABOVE GROUND treated wood products, regardless of the preservative system, will perform only in “above ground” end use applications. Applying a little bit of common sense and good judgment will in most cases, lead to the logical and safest conclusion; that joists and beams in the majority of decks and fresh water docks should be treated to the GROUND CONTACT Standard.

  • In February of this year, the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) passed a U1 Standard change affecting above ground and ground contact treated wood products.
  • This Standard change officially became effective in July 2016, when the AWPA Book of Standards was published.
  • The new Standard change is affecting treated wood purchasing practices of home centers and lumberyards throughout the U.S. Many retailers are now ordering ground contact treated 2” lumber and decking to meet the new requirements.
  • The new AWPA Standard change is not confusing or hard to apply.
  • The AWPA Book of Standards states, “AWPA Standard U1 is the primary standard for specifiers, such as architects and engineers, but also for end users and building code officials. This Standard contains the information needed by specifiers in order to select a product that best suits their needs.”
  • The AWPA Standard change establishes new guidelines for when wood shall be treated to the UC4A Ground Contact General Use category in situations that simulate ground contact, such as:
  • When there is a reasonable expectation that soil, vegetation, leaf litter or other debris may build up and remain in contact with the component.
  • When the construction itself, other structures or anticipated vegetation growth will not allow air flow to circulate underneath the construction and between decking boards.
  • When components are installed less than six inches above ground (final grade after landscaping) and supported on permeable building materials (e.g. treated wood or concrete).
  • When components are in direct contact with non-durable untreated wood, or any older construction with any evidence of decay.
  • When components are wetted on a frequent or reoccurring basis (e.g. on a freshwater floating dock or by a watering system)
  • When components are used in tropical climates.
  • In addition, the new AWPA Standard states that above ground wood components, including joists and beams for decks and fresh water docks, shall be treated to Ground Contact UC4A when they would be:
  • Difficult to maintain, repair, or replace; and
  • Critical to the performance and safety of the entire system.
  • Applying a little bit of common sense and good judgment will, in most cases, will lead to the logical — and safest — conclusion that joists and beams in the majority of decks and fresh water docks shall be treated to the Ground Contact Standard.
  • The bottom line is that if a deck joist and/or a support beam are critical to the performance and safety of the system and would be difficult to maintain, repair or replace, then wood treated to the Ground Contact Standard shall be used.
  • Above Ground treated wood products, regardless of the preservative system, will perform only in “above ground” end use applications.
  • The main reason for the new Standard change is to address misuse of above ground treated wood used in ground contact or in applications that are physically above ground but are subject to hazards comparable to ground contact exposures or are used in applications involving components that are critical to safety and performance and will be difficult to maintain, repair or replace.
  • The new Standard change will help address the misuse of above ground treated wood products.

To learn more, please visit: www.kopperspc.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Greer

Todd Greer is the Director of North American Sales and Service for Koppers Performance Chemicals. His experience in the treated lumber industry includes 21 years with Timber Products Inspection, both in the field and in management of several programs.  Todd joined the Koppers team to focus on Customer Development and Quality Control.