April Sponsored Content by: Lonza

 

 

 

Why Treated Wood?

Or, would it be better to ask, Why Not Treated Wood?

Brought to you by Lonza Wood Protection

Why Wood?

Wood products are everywhere. And it’s no wonder. Wood is, after all, nature’s sustainable building block that comes from an abundant natural resource easily and quickly replenished. It has excellent workability in all aspects of construction and, when preserved and used properly, can be designed to create outdoor living spaces that bring the inside out.

Wood is a sustainable product that is responsibly sourced from managed forest lands. That means trees used in the building industry come from forests grown as crops – much like corn or soy is grown. They are harvested. The land is left to rest for a few months. Then it is replanted at the rate of 400 trees per acre. The forest is maintained and cared for 30+ years before it is harvested. Managed forest lands are in different stages of growth so that not all the forest is harvested at one time.  Between forests, sawmills, and product manufacturers, every part of the tree is used for everything from poles, piling and dimensional lumber to pulp for paper mills, bedding for animals, and mulch for gardens.

Why Treated Wood?

When lumber goes through the treatment process, it is enhanced with preservative that helps it last longer while maintaining its natural beauty. Used for more than 100 years, treated wood makes the ideal building material for backyard projects. Because of its ease of use, do-it-yourselfers across the country have picked up a hammer, drill, nails and screws to complete weekend projects like decks, picnic tables, raised bed planters, retaining walls and more.

For more complicated projects, contractors and builders also choose treated wood because it looks beautiful, is affordable, and is easy to work with and maintain. In fact, its natural beauty enriches the backyard landscape making it an easy sell to homeowners.

Maintaining Treated Wood.

Maintenance on decks and other backyard projects can be likened to maintenance on a car. Oil changes are necessary and should be done regularly. Similarly, homeowners can easily and inexpensively perform maintenance on their decks. Recommendations include cleaning and applying a surface water repellent every couple of years to keep the deck looking beautiful for years.

If left alone, wood weathers to a warm gray, giving a project the time-worn look that is in demand with many homeowners. However, for projects to maintain that just-bought appearance, staining every few years is recommended. And, unlike composites, if lumber gets scratched by everyday use it can be easily repaired by sanding and staining.

Use Treated Wood.

Treated wood is a naturally beautiful building material that is easy to use and manipulate by contractors and do-it-yourselfers alike. Once a project is built, with little future maintenance, the homeowner can enjoy an enhanced quality of outdoor living for years.

Learn more: www.WolmanizedWood.com

NADRA Atlanta Chapter – December 2012 Meeting

NADRA Atlanta Chapter – December 2012 Meeting Re-Cap

It was a great Year End event for our Chapter this past Wednesday evening at the Maggiano’s , Cumberland and thanks to all who attended. We had 70+ attendees and several guests including our “Deck For a Solider” recipients – Sergeant Michael Dickerson and his wife Jessica.  I want to thank Kirk Hammond with Lonza for sponsoring the meeting and for his comments pertaining to our chapter and his involvement with the National Board. .  Our guest speaker was John Gordon, The Director of Strategic  Accounts for the Home Depot.   John’s presentation was informative and eye opening as he related some principals of operating with Integrity and also gave insight into the current market conditions and an encouraging look toward future market direction.

We started off the evening by hearing from Jeffrey Johnson and David Elenbaum.  Jeff shared information on a nonprofit that he is working on and David shared some of the directives and happenings from the recent National Board meeting. I then had the opportunity to review the past year and highlighted many of the activities and events that our Chapter participated in.  We had a great year as a chapter and it was a pleasure to review all that we accomplished.  I want to thank all of our sponsors during the past year:  Azek (Bill Sullivan), Duradek (Norm Shafer), Fiberon (James Gunning), Trex (Larry Pease), and Lonza (Kirk Hammond).  We could not have executed our plan this past year without your help and we are all grateful for each of you stepping up and contributing.  We celebrated our third Deck For A Solider build and presented certificates to the 27 entities and individuals that participated.  We also introduced Sergeant Dickerson and his Wife Jessica and thanked them for their service and sacrifice.  I strongly believe that D4S is the best thing we do as a chapter and want to thank all of you for giving so much to this endeavor.  We held our first “Toys For Tots” drive this year and it was an overwhelming success.  I want to give special thanks to Frank Pologruto for putting this effort together and heading it up.  Frank and I delivered close to 200 toys to the center yesterday and I am hopeful that we can make this effort an annual event.

Our next meeting will be held in February of 2013 – time, place and date to be determined.  We are looking for speakers and sponsors for next year and our Leadership group will be meeting in January to put the plan together so if you are interested in sponsoring or if you have any ideas, speaker thoughts, or anything that you would like for us to focus on please contact me.  Thanks again for being a part of our Chapter and for all that each of you do to make us successful.

Hoping that each of you have a Blessed and Happy Holiday Season.

Respectfully Submitted,

Keith Compton / Atlanta Chapter President